Volcano and earthquake Updates – Fogo volcano, Cabo Verde eruption (update + video), Long Valley

Last update: November 24, 2014 at 1:47 pm by By

After Rodger Wilson was obliged to discontinue his daily participation at this site, we have decided to start up an El Hierro type article. The newest additions will always be on top and if the article gets too long, we will cut off a part of it and archive it. This url will always be the one to follow and if you leave our page open in your browser, the page will refresh every 15 minutes automatically.
Please be a little patient with this new format.
This report is compiled out of many information sources.

Earthquake-report.com can only survive with PRIVATE DONATIONS

Your gift will be highly appreciated, Thank You

For our El Hierro volcano report : Click here


-

Mammoth lakes Long valley caldera, California update November 24, 13:15 UTC
There we go again, a new swarm seems to have started, mostly micro quakes. No danger at the current hypocenter depths. The micro quakes indicate however lava on the move

Screen Shot 2014-11-24 at 14.13.58

Fogo, Cabo Verde update November 24; 10:25 UTC
The Fogo eruption on Cabo Verde islands resulted in the evacuation of hundreds of residents and the closure of a local airport.

Screen Shot 2014-11-24 at 11.23.19

Video of the eruption captured by a local islander


Fogo volcano, Cabo Verde enters in eruption Update November 23, 15:10 UTC
The volcano’s last eruption was in 1995. The eruption started this morning at 10:00 local time (11:00 UTC).
The volcanologists had enough precursors to send an evacuation call to the people living near the volcano. Signs of increased activity were recvorded since many weeks and even months.
The eruptive cloud was detected by the VAAC from Toulouse. A red aviation alert has been issued for the region around the volcano. There is almost NO ash in the air at this moment (see VAAC image below)
As there are NO live links with the instruments on Fogo, we can only guess on what is happening. Fogo has normally Strombolian eruptions. Strombolian eruptions are powerful lava fountains when the eruption starts but are mostly limited in time, lava flows are a normal part of it.
The best website to follow this eruption is the one from Observatório Vulcanológico de Cabo Verde (OVCV)

Screen Shot 2014-11-23 at 15.52.44

Screen Shot 2014-11-23 at 16.04.09


 

New swarm below Mammoth volcano, California Update November 22, 00:35
The swarm started at 06:00 UTC this morning (wee list below).
The depth of the hypocenters of 8 km is absolutely NOT dangerous. It means that magma is moving at a depth of 8 km below the complex.

Screen Shot 2014-11-22 at 01.22.39

Large explosion at Colima volcano, Mexico
The Civil Defense of Mexico reported that todays explosion was among the expected scenarios. The ash rose 5,000 meter above the crater. There was never and still is no risk for the population living around the volcano.

Landslides news
An interesting report from BNPB Indonesia mentions that in 2013 Indonesia had 332 landslides who claimed the lives of 262, making it the most important disaster type of 2013.

Nevado del Ruiz, Colombia Update November 21


 

Volcano Activity for the week November 12 – November 18

Screen Shot 2014-11-21 at 00.34.48Kilauea  | Hawaiian Islands (USA)
During 12-18 November HVO reported that Kilauea’s 27 June NE-trending lava flow continued to be active. On 15 November the closest active lava to Pahoa Village Road was about 630 m upslope of the road. Multiple breakouts were active upslope of Apa’a Street and Cemetery Road, including a breakout traveling along the S margin of the earlier flow that crossed Cemetery Road and burned the road surface. During an overflight on 17 November, scientists noted a marked decrease in the surface breakouts that have been active N of Kaohe Homesteads, and near Apa’a Street and the Pahoa Japanese Cemetery during the previous few weeks. This decrease in supply was caused by a large breakout from the lava tube at Pu’u Kahauale’a, near Pu’u ‘O’o, which began overnight during 14-15 November. A report on 18 November noted that the lower portion of the lava flow, near the Kaohe Homesteads and Pahoa, had stalled, but breakouts remained active in the upslope portion of the flow between 1.6 km and 9 km NE of Pu’u ‘O’o.
The circulating lava lake occasionally rose and fell in the deep pit within Halema’uma’u Crater. Gas emissions remained elevated. The plume from the vent continued to deposit variable amounts of tephra onto nearby areas; smaller particles may have been dropped several kilometers away. At Pu’u ‘O’o Crater, glow emanated from several outgassing openings in the crater floor.

Pavlof  | United States
On 12 November AVO raised the Aviation Color Code for Pavlov to Orange and the Volcano Alert Level to Watch, citing the beginning of a new phase of eruptive activity at about 1500. An observer in Cold Bay (52 km SW) reported that ash emissions rose slightly above the summit; minor ash emissions were also recorded by an FAA-operated webcam in Cold Bay beginning at 1650. Seismicity increased and remained elevated. Lava fountaining occurred from a vent just N of the summit and flows of rock debris and ash descended the N flank. A thermal anomaly appeared in satellite images at 1740. The eruption continued on 14 November. A narrow ash plume observed in satellite images drifted 200 km at an altitude of 4.8 km (16,000 ft) a.s.l.
The eruption intensified on 15 November prompting AVO to raise the Aviation Color Code to Red and the Volcano Alert Level to Warning. Ash plumes rose to an altitude of 7.6 km (25,000 ft) a.s.l. and drifted 200 km NW. The intensity of seismic tremor had increased significantly. Pilot reports through 1230 indicated that the ash plume had risen to an altitude of 9.1 km (30,000 ft) a.s.l. At about 1900 seismicity abruptly decreased and remained low. Satellite observations confirmed a significant decrease in ash emissions; discrete seismic events possibly indicated minor ash emissions that were not detected in satellite images. The Aviation Color Code was lowered to Orange and the Volcano Alert Level was lowered to Watch. Pilot reports on 16 November indicated no eruptive activity, and satellite images showed diminished temperatures in the summit crater. During 17-18 November seismic activity remained at low levels and elevated surface temperatures on the upper NW flank were observed, consistent with a flow of lava and/or hot debris.

Popocatepetl  | Mexico
CENAPRED reported that during 12-15 November seismicity at Popocatépetl indicated continuing emissions of water vapor, gas, and small amounts of ash; ash was not observed during 16-18 November. Incandescence from the crater at night was noted. The Alert Level remained at to Yellow, Phase Two.

Sinarka  | Shiashkotan Island (Russia)
SVERT reported that satellite images of Sinarka showed steam-and-gas emissions drifted 40 km E on 11 November. The next day a weak thermal anomaly was detected. Gas-and-steam activity became more robust; emissions drifted NE. A weak thermal anomaly was again detected on 16 November. The Aviation Color Code was raised to Yellow.

Turrialba  | Costa Rica
OVSICORI-UNA reported an explosion from Turrialba that started at 1926 on 13 November which lasted about 10 minutes. Another explosion occurred at 1342 on 14 November and lasted about 15 minutes, although the strongest part was 7 minutes long. National park officials reported ashfall at the top of Irazú. Volcanologists observed the 14 November explosion and collected samples at Hacienda La Central, 3 km SE of West Crater.

Zhupanovsky  | Eastern Kamchatka (Russia)
KVERT reported that moderate explosive eruptions at Zhupanovsky likely continued during 7-14 November. Satellite images detected ash plumes drifting 270 km SE during 7-10 November. The Aviation Color Code remained at Orange.


 

Bárðarbunga scientific advisory board update November 19, 15:55 UTC
The volcanic eruption in Holuhraun continues with similar intensity as it has for the last two weeks. Lava continues to flow out of the lava lake in the crater to east southeast.
- Seismic activity in Bardarbunga continues to be strong. The two biggest earthquakes that were detected since noon on Monday were both of magnitude M4,6. On Tuesday, 18. November at 18:21 and on tonight, 19. November, at 00:29. In total 16 earthquakes bigger then M4,0 were detected over the period and 51 earthquakes between M3,0-3,9. In total 200 earthquakes were detected in Bardarbunga since noon on Friday.
- About 25 smaller earthquakes were detected in the dyke and at the eruption site in Holuhraun. All of them under magnitude M1,6.
- The subsidence of the Bardarbunga caldera continues with similar rate as last few weeks

Chiles and Cerro Negro volcano Update November 19, 11:10 UTC
Chiles/Cerro Negro volcano, Ecuador/Colombia. 206.000 earthquakes since September 29, 35,000 last week alone. Most quakes hypocenters 2-9km depth, some at 8-10km.

Living alongside a volcano – 3 great video‘s from people living near La Soufrière volcano on St Vincent



Bárðarbunga update November 18, 16:52 UTC
Seismic activity around Bárðarbunga and in the dyke intrusion since the last report yesterday morning is comparable to previous days, no earthquake reached magnitude 5. The fissure eruption in Holuhraun continues at similar force as in recent days.
The strongest earthquakes at Bárðarbunga were M4.5 this morning at 03:09 and 03:18, as well as magnitude 4.6 now at 09:35. Additionally, 7 events exceeded M4 and 28 were in the range M3.0-3.9. All in all around 100 events have been detected in that area.
Around 15 earthquakes were detected in the northern end of the dyke intrusion, the strongest was magnitude 1.6 yesterday at 18:48. Low seismic activity around Herðubreið. No changes in the eruption activity in Holuhraun (based on camera observations throughout yesterday and last night).
Some remarks from the University of Iceland
** SO2 from #Holuhraun ~30-40 thousand tonnes/day, meaning ~13 million tonnes/year if it continues at similar rate.
** Total SO2 from volcanoes on Earth = ~55 million tonnes/year.  Total SO2 from humans = ~ 101 million tonnes/year
** Laki eruption (1783-84) released ~120 million tonnes of SO2 in just 8 months! Holuhraun eruption small by comparison

Bárðarbunga update November 18, 16:47 UTC
A Mila webcam image shows a river of lava at the time of making this update

Screen Shot 2014-11-18 at 17.39.17


 

Deadly landslides in Italy and Switzerland


 

Pavlof Volcano, Alaska Update November 16, 12:44 UTC
The eruption of Pavlof Volcano that began on November 12 has intensified and the ash cloud height is currently estimated at 25,000 ft above sea level. Thus, the Aviation Color Code has been raised to RED and the Volcano Alert Level to WARNING.
The intensity of seismic tremor has increased significantly over the past 6 hours, and satellite data indicate that the ash cloud is now at an altitude of 25,000 ft above sea level. As of 11:00 am AKST (20:00 UTC) the cloud is moving towards the northwest and extends for about 125 miles (200 km) downwind.

MODIS satellite image showing the volcanic ash cloud from the eruption of Pavlof Volcano. The cloud extends for more 250 miles from the volcano at an estimate height of at least 35,000 ft above sea level.

MODIS satellite image showing the volcanic ash cloud from the eruption of Pavlof Volcano. The cloud extends for more 250 miles from the volcano at an estimate height of at least 35,000 ft above sea level.

Hawaii Pahoa update November 16 13:55 UTC
Breakouts were active below Apa`a St./Cemetery Rd., a short distance north of the cemetery, and approximately 650 meters (0.4 miles) upslope of Pāhoa Village Road.
The majority of breakouts were active upslope of Apa`a St./Cemetery Rd. Breakouts remained active in a lobe that is upslope of the transfer station, and the leading tip of this lobe was 180 meters (200 yards) upslope of Apa`a St. This lobe is also widening towards the east. Additional breakouts were active upslope of Apa`a St/Cemetery Rd., including a breakout running along the south margin of the flow that crossed Cemetery Rd. and was burning the road surface.
Pilot reports and sporadic webcam views indicate that a new breakout from the June 27th lava tube began over the past day close to Puʻu ʻŌʻō, roughly 1.6 km (1 mile) northeast of the June 27th vent. Reports indicate that activity on this breakout diminished through the day.

Screen Shot 2014-11-16 at 14.56.13


 

Pavlof Volcano, Alaska Update November 14, 10:42 UTC
Pavlof Volcano has entered a new phase of eruptive activity. The Aviation Color Code has been increased to Orange and the Volcano Alert Level to Watch. A ground observer in Cold Bay located 60 km (37 miles) from the volcano has reported ash emissions up to 9000 ft above sea level (about 700 ft above the summit). Minor ash emissions were visible in the FAA-operated web camera in Cold Bay beginning around 1:50 UTC on 13 November (4:50 pm AKST on 12 November). Seismic tremor has increased over the past several hours and remains elevated. Satellite observation of the volcano are currently obscured by a low cloud deck.
Recent Observations:
Minor ash emissions observed in web camera images.
Ash height reported up to 9000 ft above sea level.
Remarks: Pavlof Volcano is a snow- and ice-covered stratovolcano located on the southwestern end of the Alaska Peninsula about 953 km (592 mi) southwest of Anchorage. The volcano is about 7 km (4.4 mi) in diameter and has active vents on the north and east sides close to the summit. With over 40 historic eruptions, it is one of the most consistently active volcanoes in the Aleutian arc. Eruptive activity is generally characterized by sporadic Strombolian lava fountaining continuing for a several-month period. Ash plumes as high as 49,000 ft ASL have been generated by past eruptions of Pavlof, and during the 2013 eruption, ash plumes as high as 27,000 feet above sea level extending as much as 500 km (310 mi) beyond the volcano were generated. The nearest community, Cold Bay, is located 60 km (37 miles) to the southwest of Pavlof.

Screen Shot 2014-11-14 at 11.44.24

Pavlof in eruption as viewed from Cold Bay on the evening of November 12, 2014. Image courtesy Photographer/Creator: Carol Damberg

Screen Shot 2014-11-14 at 12.51.01

Terra MODIS satellite image of Pavlof Volcano (pink arrow), with brown ash plume extending 125 mi (200 km) to northwest, November 13, 2014


 

Volcano Activity for the week November 5 – November 11

Screen Shot 2014-11-13 at 17.59.54

Cerro Negro de Mayasquer  | Colombia-Ecuador
On 4 November Servicio Geológico Colombiano’s Observatorio Vulcanológico and Sismológico de Pasto (SGC-OVSP) reported that seismic activity at Cerro Negro de Mayasquer and Chiles volcanoes remained elevated. Since 29 September 2014 about 132,000 earthquakes had been detected, with 3,200 of those events occurring on 4 November. During the previous week hypocenters were located 0.3-6.3 km S and SW of Chiles, at depths of 3-9 km below the summit. Local magnitudes were between 0.7 and 4.6. The Alert Level remained at Orange (level 3 of 4).

Kilauea  | Hawaiian Islands (USA)
During 5-11 November HVO reported that Kilauea’s 27 June NE-trending lava flow continued to be active. Breakout lava flows behind the stalled leading edge continued to advance. On 10 November the closest active lava to Pahoa Village Road was about 450 m upslope of the road, on the N margin of the flow field. Multiple breakouts were active around Apa’a Street and Cemetery Road. Lava advanced to within 20 m of the transfer station fence and through residential property across the street; at 1155 an unoccupied home on that lot was ignited by advancing lava.
The circulating lava lake occasionally rose and fell in the deep pit within Halema’uma’u Crater. Gas emissions remained elevated. The plume from the vent continued to deposit variable amounts tephra onto nearby areas; smaller particles may have been dropped several kilometers away. At Pu’u ‘O’o Crater, glow emanated from several outgassing openings in the crater floor.

Popocatepetl  | Mexico
CENAPRED reported that a small series of explosions at Popocatépetl, starting at 2003 on 4 November and ending at 0130 on 5 November, produced a continuous plume of gas, steam, and small amounts of ash that rose 1 km and drifted N. The seismic network detected 191 explosions during the period. Incandescent material was periodically ejected onto the N and E flanks, as far as 800 m. Ashfall was reported in Paso de Cortes.
On 6 November a small rockslide on the SW flank was recorded by a webcam and the seismic network. Scientists aboard an overflight observed dome 53, emplaced during 4-5 November; it was an estimated 250 m in diameter and 30 m thick. During 7-11 November seismicity indicated continuing emissions of water vapor, gas, and occasional small amounts of ash. Incandescence from the crater was observed most nights. Explosions were detected during 10-11 November. The first explosion ejected incandescent tephra and generated an ash plume that rose 1.2 km and drifted SE. Others generated plumes that rose as high as 1.2 km and drifted SE and E. The Alert Level remained at to Yellow, Phase Two.

Turrialba  | Costa Rica
On 7 November OVSICORI-UNA reported that seismic activity at Turrialba had decreased overall during the previous few days. A seismic signal indicating a strong emission started at 2320 on 6 November and lasted about 50 minutes.

Zhupanovsky  | Eastern Kamchatka (Russia)
KVERT reported that a strong explosive eruption at Zhupanovsky occurred at 0955 on 8 November, generating an ash plume that rose to an altitude of 10 km (32,800 ft) a.s.l. and drifted 26 km SSW. The Aviation Color Code was raised to Orange. On 9 November ash plumes detected in satellite images rose to altitudes of 3-4 km (9,800-13,100 ft) a.s.l. and drifted 190-250 km SE.


 

Bárðarbunga update November 12, 17:45 UTC
The most beautiful “action” video we have seen so far. Looks like a totally new volcano! (which it isn’t of course)

Mayon volcano, Philippines – November 12, 14:38 UTC
Mayon Volcano’s current condition remains unstable due to slow but sustained ground deformation of the edifice by subsurface magma since the start of unrest this year. This is indicated by sustained swelling or inflation of the edifice, as measured by precise leveling on October 20-27, relative to both the third week of October 2014 and baseline measurements beginning 2010. Electronic tilt data from the continuous network on the northwest flank similarly indicate continuing inflation of the edifice since August 2014, succeeding a previous inflation event in June to July 2014. These inflation events correspond to batches of magma (approximately 107 cubic meters) slowly being intruded at depth but that have yet to be erupted at the crater, and therefore posing threat of eventual hazardous eruption at an unknown time in the near future.
Mayon’s seismic network, however, detected three (3) volcanic earthquakes and one (1) rockfall event during the past 24 hours, consistent with overall slow magma intrusion at depth that has characterized this year’s activity. Emission of white steam plumes was of moderate volume that crept downslope and drifted towards south. Crater glow was not observed last night due to rain clouds that covered the summit, while sulfur dioxide (SO2) emitted at the crater averaged 106 tonnes/day on 09 November 2014, which is below the baseline level during normal periods. The visual and gas parameters may denote either poor magma degassing or the generally low gas content of intruding subsurface magma. Seismicity, visual and gas parameters, however, may suddenly change within a few hours or days should magma breach the surface in an eventual eruption.
Mayon Volcano’s alert status remains at Alert Level 3. At this present stage, potentially eruptible magma has already been intruded and continues to be intruded beneath the edifice. At any given time in the following weeks to months, this magma can eventually be erupted quietly as lava flows or explosively as vertical eruption columns and pyroclastic flows or both. It is strongly recommended that the 6-km radius Permanent Danger Zone (PDZ) around the volcano and the 7-km Extended Danger Zone (EDZ) on the southeastern flank be enforced due to the danger of rock falls, landslides and sudden explosions or dome collapse that may generate hazardous volcanic flows. PHIVOLCS maintains close monitoring of Mayon Volcano and any new development will be communicated to all concerned stakeholders.

Bárðarbunga update November 12, 13:31 UTC

Screen Shot 2014-11-12 at 14.29.57

The cause of yesterdays bump in Bardarbunga subsidence graph. The GPS monitor was moved because of heavy snow

Hawaii Pahoa update November 12 12:04 UTC
Lava heading toward transfer station in Pahoa
At this point, officials can’t do anything to save the facility except hope the lava makes another turn, but as it has been the case since the flow started back in June, the path is unpredictable.


 

Bárðarbunga update November 11, 18:49 UTC
University of Iceland reports about the sudden inflation of Bardarbunga:
For those following the subsidence of #Bardarbunga may have seen the uplift of 1.5m today. The GPS monitor was being lifted by scientists because of heavy snow. Bardarbunga is still subsiding at a similar rate as before. ER : Thanks for clarifying as some people did report us already the anomaly.

Screen Shot 2014-11-11 at 19.49.56

Sinabung volcano, Indonesia

Bárðarbunga update November 11, 11:35 UTC
Yesterday’s scientific report
The eruption continues with similar intensity. The lava field is now 70 square kilometres.
- Seismic activity in Bardarbunga continues to be strong. Since Friday, 7. November, around 200 earthquakes have been detected in the caldera. The biggest one was M5,2 yesterday at 21:19. In total 20 earthquakes between M4,0 and M5,0 were detected since Friday.
- The subsidence of the Bardarbunga caldera continues with similar rate as last few weeks.
- In total 20 smaller earthquakes were detected in the dyke and at the eruption site in Holuhraun since Friday.
- Displacements of GPS stations show a slower subsidence towards Bardarbunga.

Hawaii Pahoa update November 11 09:05 UTC
The leading edge of the flow has not advanced since October 30. The closest active lava to Pāhoa Village Road is located about 450 meters (500 yards) upslope of the road on the north margin of the flow field, below the Pāhoa cemetery.
A number of breakouts were active around Apaʻa St. / Cemetery Road. Active lava has moved to within about 20 meters (22 yards) of the transfer station fence and also continued to expand through private property across the street from the station. At 11:55 AM, HST, an unoccupied home on that lot was set on fire by advancing lava.
In the 2.5 km (1.5 mi) upslope of Apaʻa St. / Cemetery Road, minor expansion of the flow field has occurred over the weekend. The most significant activity on the entire flow field was a narrow finger of lava that has advanced downslope from the wide portion of the flow just above the narrow gulley through which lava advanced toward Pāhoa more than two weeks ago. That finger was about 700 meters (765 yards) above the transfer station as of late Monday morning.
Summit tilt was steady for most of Monday morning, but a period of inflation began at about 2 PM, with a commensurate rise in lava level within the summit eruptive vent.


 

Hawaii Pahoa update November 10 17:40 UTC
The leading edge of the flow has not advanced since October 30. The closest active lava to Pāhoa Village Road is located on the north margin of the flow field between the cemetery and private property. Small, sluggish breakouts and flow inflation were also occurring in the vicinity of the cemetery.
More significant lava activity was occurring upslope of the cemetery. Early Sunday morning, a breakout just above Apaʻa St. / Cemetery Road sent lava across the road along the north margin of the existing flow. By the afternoon, that breakout had separated into three lobes: 1) moving along the existing flow margin towards the cemetery, 2) moving down the road towards the transfer station, and 3) moving towards an abandoned set of buildings across the street from the transfer station. These lobes were advancing at a rate of about 5 meters (6 yards) per hour or less. By Sunday afternoon, the lobe along the road had come into contact with the cinder pile surrounding a newly installed metal power pole.
The lobe near the transfer station remains active and has advanced to within about 20 meters (22 yards) of the station fence. Small-scale topography is expected to direct this flow parallel to the fence line, however.

The volcano will not destroy this electricity pole (they hope). Radiation heat will be extreme but we truly hope that it will succeed)

The volcano will not destroy this electricity pole (they hope). Radiation heat will be extreme but we truly hope that it will succeed)

Submarine eruption at Monowai volcano (Pacific Ocean)
When Monowai, a submarine volcano 1500 km north-north-east of Auckland, is erupting it produces an unusual type of seismic wave called a T-wave. T-waves travel very efficiently in the ocean and those from Monowai are often recorded on a seismograph in Rarotonga, about 2000 km to the east. They are also well recorded by a seismic network in French Polynesia. Over the last few years we have learned to recognise the T-waves recorded in Rarotonga, and, with the help of observations from the RNZAF, commercial pilots and shipping, we are now reasonably confident we can identify when Monowai is erupting.
Submarine volcanoes are found all the way from New Zealand to Tonga. Monowai is about 1500 km north-north-east of Auckland, two-thirds of the way to Tonga, and is one of the most active submarine volcanoes in the south-west Pacific. The top of the volcano is only about 100 m below the sea surface.  Activity is occasionally seen from passing planes, but confirming eruptions has always been one of our challenges.
When erupting, the discharges from Monowai can discolour the sea, sometimes for several kilometres around the volcano.  Debris, pumice, foam and scum  are often present, but we get few chances to see these. Fortunately, the RNZAF and commercial flights do pass this area and we receive reports from pilots when they see any activity. The latest observations are from a RNZAF flight on 31 October and allowed us to confirm that our interpretation of the data from the Rarotonga seismograph is correct, and Monowai has been erupting. Monowai has actually erupted three times in October, each time for just a few days. The current activity appears to be weaker than we observed in 2009 and 2012.The recent visual confirmation of an eruption by the RNZAF is great as it gives us more faith in our interpretation of the Rarotonga seismic data. We are also able to share this with Maritime NZ and LINZ so they can keep shipping up to date on navigation hazards.
Article from Geonet Volcanologist Brad Scott

Image courtesy Geonet New Zealand

Image courtesy Geonet New Zealand

Image courtesy and copyright Geonet New Zealand

Image courtesy and copyright Geonet New Zealand


 

Volcano Activity for the week of October 29 – November 4 2014

Screen Shot 2014-11-08 at 18.48.41Kilauea  | Hawaiian Islands (USA)
During 29 October-4 November HVO reported that Kilauea’s 27 June NE-trending lava flow continued to be active. Breakout lava flows behind the stalled leading edge continued to advance; during 30-31 October a lobe downslope of the Pahoa cemetery was active, burning trees in a forested area and causing numerous loud methane bursts. The lobe entered residential property at 1645 on 31 October, advanced along the N edge of the property, and then stalled on 4 November. The interior areas of the flows continued to inflate.
The circulating lava lake occasionally rose and fell in the deep pit within Halema’uma’u Crater. Gas emissions remained elevated. The plume from the vent continued to deposit variable amounts tephra onto nearby areas; smaller particles may have been dropped several kilometers away. At Pu’u ‘O’o Crater, glow emanated from several outgassing openings in the crater floor.

Popocatepetl  | Mexico
CENAPRED reported that during 29 October-4 November seismicity at Popocatépetl indicated continuing emissions of water vapor, gas, and small amounts of ash. Incandescence from the crater was observed most nights. The seismic network detected nine explosions during 29-30 October and two explosions on 31 October; ash plumes rose as high as 1.2 km and drifted SW. Ash plumes rose 1 km and drifted E on 1 November and SW on 3 November. Periodic ejections of incandescent tephra landed 600 m away on the E and N crater flanks on 4 November. Ash plumes rose 1 km. The Alert Level remained at to Yellow, Phase Two.

Sinabung  | Indonesia  | 3.17°N, 98.392°E  | Elevation 2460 m
Based on a pilot observation, the Darwin VAAC reported localized ash from Sinabung on 2 November, but a meteorological cloud in the area prevented further observations. A pyroclastic flow and an ash plume were recorded by the webcam on 3 November. The ash plume rose to an estimated altitude of 4.6 km (15,000 ft) a.s.l. and drifted NE; the altitude of the ash plume was again uncertain due to meteorological cloud. On 4 November an ash plume observed with the webcam rose to an altitude of 4.3 km (14,000 ft) a.s.l. and drifted N.

Turrialba  | Costa Rica
OVSICORI-UNA reported that seismic activity at Turrialba had started to increase in late September, and then in mid-October a three-day swarm of volcano-tectonic earthquakes was recorded. The largest event, a M 2.8, occurred at 2035 on 16 October at a depth of 5 km beneath the active crater. Magmatic degassing intensified during 28-29 October; sulfur dioxide flux was 2,000 tons per day, higher than the 1,300 tons per day average measured in September and the highest so far during 2014. During the morning of 29 October a seismologist noted a tremor signal which increased in amplitude during the afternoon and evening. An observer at a lodge noted that the gas plume was darker than usual with some ash. At 2310 a small phreatomagmatic eruption from the West Crater lasted about 25 minutes and ended with a strong explosion heard by nearby villagers. An ash cloud rose to an altitude of 5.8 km (19,000 ft) a.s.l. and drifted WSW. Ash fell in San Gerardo de Irazú, San Ramón de Tres Ríos, Coronado, Moravia, Curridabat, Desamparados, Aserrí, Escazú, Santa Ana, Belén, Guácima de Alajuela, Río Segundo de Alajuela, San Pedro Montes de Oca, Guadalupe, areas of Heredia, and the capital of San José (70 km W). The eruption destroyed the wall between the West and Central craters, depositing material around the Central Crater and partially burying it. According to a news report 11 people from Santa Cruz de Turrialba were evacuated to shelters and the national park was closed. Some schools were also temporarily closed, affecting over 300 area students.
The eruption continued during 30-31 October; analyses of collected tephra showed that the proportion of juvenile material increased its volume from 3-5% on 30 October to 7-10% the next day. Magma had not previously reached the surface at Turrialba since an eruption in 1866.
An explosion at 0520 on 1 November generated an ash plume that drifted towards the E and N parts of the Central Valley. A 3 November report stated that during the previous 24 hours seismicity had decreased significantly and no explosions were detected; seismicity remained elevated as compared to levels detected prior to the current activity. An online tool that allowed residents to note if they had observed ashfall during 31 October-4 November showed a dispersion pattern in the Central Valley W and NW of Turrialba.

Hawaii Pahoa update November 8 09:37 UTC
The leading edge of the flow has not advanced since October 30, but multiple breakouts were observed upslope of the flow tip. The lowest of these was active below the Pāhoa cemetery, about 450 meters (490 yards) above Pāhoa Village Road.
Several breakouts are active in the 2.5 km (1.5 mi) upslope of Apaʻa St. / Cemetery Road. One active lobe, about 150 meters (165 yards) above the road, has merged with the now inactive lobe closest to the transfer station. Another series of breakouts was occurring at the top of the narrow gulley that channeled lava towards Pāhoa two weeks ago, about 700 meters (765 yards) upslope of the road. The large lobe extending north from the Kaohe Homesteads area also continues to be active.
Overall, breakouts of lava in the distal part of the June 27th flow are mostly confined within the existing flow field, although flow margins are being extended in some areas.
Other small breakouts were observed farther upslope, including one about halfway between the distal end of the flow and Puʻu ʻŌʻō, near where lava first entered the crack system, and another on the north flank of Puʻu ʻŌʻō itself. The flow closest to Puʻu ʻŌʻō damaged some equipment that HVO scientists had installed to observe the lava tube through a skylight.
The cross sectional area of the lava tube measured Friday was 2.4 square meters (2.9 square yards). This is a slight increase from that measured last week (on October 31) and implies a small increase in the amount of lava flowing through the tube.
There was no net summit deformation over the past day. Technicians repaired the tiltmeter at Puʻu ʻŌʻō, but it is too early to tell if the work has corrected the malfunction there, as the tiltmeter requires a few days to settle before it can be returned to operation.

Screen Shot 2014-11-08 at 10.32.48

Bárðarbunga update November 8 09:37 UTC
The volcanic eruption in Holuhraun continues with similar intensity.
- Seismic activity in Bardarbunga continues to be strong. Since Wednesday, 5. November, around 150 earthquakes have been detected in the caldera. The biggest one was M5,4 today at 07:11. In total 15 earthquakes stronger then M3,0 were detected over the last two days.
- The GPS station in the centre of Bardarbunga show that the subsidence of the caldera has decreased. Other measurements do though show that the volume of the subsidence increases with the same rate as it has done since these measurements started in September. This indicates that the flow of magma from Bardarbunga is not decreasing.
- Smaller earthquakes were detected in the dyke and at the eruption site in Holuhraun.
- Displacements of GPS stations show a slower subsidence towards Bardarbunga.

Picture from the Uni of Iceland of a couple of days ago

Picture from the Uni of Iceland of a couple of days ago


 

Voters in Texas city OK ban on fracking expansion
Voters in the oil-rich North Texas city of Denton voted Tuesday to ban further permitting of hydraulic fracturing, upsetting a campaign backed by big oil and gas companies opposing the measure. The vote made Denton, which sits atop a large natural gas reserve, the first city in Texas to pass such a ban. It sets up a legal showdown between the city and industry groups that have warned the ban could be followed by lawsuits and a severe hit to Denton’s economy. With early returns indicating the ban passed with nearly 60 percent of the vote, Mayor Chris Watts said the city would move to enforce it. Though pre-existing permits would remain valid, opponents have called it a wholesale ban on drilling.
Read the full article here

General info
We will cut a part of this page later today. It really gets too long :)

Bárðarbunga update November 7 08:12 UTC
New web pages present observations of gas pollution in Iceland (see header). Included is a registration form for the public, a web-viewer showing all public observations and another viewer showing the results of measurements with handheld meters which have been distributed around the country.

Hawaii Pahoa update November 7 08:10 UTC
Scientists of the USGS Hawaiian Volcano Observatory conducted field observations of the June 27th lava flow on Thursday, November 6, 2014. The leading edge of the flow has not advanced since last Thursday, October 30, but minor breakouts were observed upslope of the flow tip. These include small breakouts 500-600 meters (550-660 yards) upslope of the stalled flow front, in the area of the cemetery. Another breakout was active on the north margin of the flow roughly 300 meters (330 yards) upslope from Cemetery Rd./Apa`a St. Breakouts have also been active farther upslope, several kilometers upslope of Cemetery Rd./Apa`a St., but these were not visited on foot during today’s visit.
There was no net summit deformation over the past day.

Screen Shot 2014-11-07 at 09.14.53


 

Hawaii Pahoa update

Hawaii Pahoa update November 6 09:41 UTC
The leading edge of the flow has not advanced since last Thursday, October 30, but minor breakouts were observed upslope of the flow tip just below and above of Apa`a Street. The most significant (although still minor) breakout was located on about 2.5 km (1.5 miles) above Apa`a Street.
Two small breakouts were also observed upslope of the crack system. The lava level in a lava-tube skylight on the flank of Pu`u `Ō`ō suggests lava discharge remains relatively low.
There was no net summit deformation throughout Wednesday.

Screen Shot 2014-11-06 at 10.41.31

Below great Pahoehoe lava video of November 5 via: County of Hawaii. Footage of lava flow from Nov 5, 2014 in this video (Puna lava flow). Video by Staff Sgt. Katie Gray


Bárðarbunga update November 5 18:24 UTC
The eruption seems unchanged but driving conditions have worsened, hindering field observations. The subsidence of the Bárðarbunga caldera has reached 44 m which corresponds to 1.1-1.2 km³. The adjacent geothermal cauldrons have deepened by 5-8 m in the last eleven days. Horizontal displacements towards Bárðarbunga have decreased slightly.

Screen Shot 2014-11-05 at 19.25.27

Nevado de Chiles and Cerro Negro update November 5 18:21 UTC
INGEOMINAS has returned to posting seismograms from the Colombian volcanoes,…now including data from Nevado de Chiles and Cerro Negro de Mayasquer!  The INGEOMINAS seismograms are of better quality than the ones posted by EPN (Ecuador).  Between the two websites, you can now observe virtually real-time seismic, (including seismo-acoustic “noise” levels), deformation and visual data from the rumbling volcanoes.

CERN_BHN_OP_--.2014110500

Sinabung volcano Samatra, Indonesia


OLDER ARCHIVED PARTS OF THIS REPORT :

2013 : July 8 – July 31
2013 : June 24 – July 7
2013 : June 8 – June 23
2013 : May 26 – June 7
2013 : June 8 – August 20
2013 : August 21 – October 27
2013 : October 28 – December 12
2013 : December 13 – January 30
2014 : February 1 – May 20
2014 : May 21 – August 20
2014 : August 21 – August 28 (Bardarbunga volcano Iceland)
2014 : August 29 – September 4 (Bardarbunga and Tavurvur)
2014 : September 5 – September 18 (Bardarbunga and Mayon)
2014 : September 19 – October 6 (Bardarbunga, Mayon, Long Valley and Ontakesan deadly eruption)
2014 : October 7 – November 4 (Bardarbunga, Kilauea, Chiles, Sinabung)

Comments

  1. Gordon Hervey says:

    October 18 2013 UTC
    I always enjoy these reports and wanted to ask a question that I have also posted on Volcano Monitor. Japan Today has an Oct 18 article “Izu Oshima mayor under fire for not issuing evacuation orders.” A Tokyo Uni expert is quoted “the top layer of volcanic ash from recent explosions had been washed off by the massive rainfall….knocking down trees and…houses”. Dozens still missing or dead. My point is that the local volcano Mount Mihara must have had frequent explosions, yet I have not seen the name before now on any listings, anywhere. Modis data problems, Japan keeping secrets, what could this sort of thing imply?

    • Richard Rodger Wilson says:

      Hi Gordon,

      You have to remember, when a volcanologist (geologist) says “recent” he may be referring to an event that has occurred during the last 10,000 years! Mount Mihara has in fact erupted more recently (in a big way in 1986!) to produce exposed ash layers on the island. Regardless of their age, fragmental volcanic deposits are always susceptible to remobilization from heavy rains. If you live any time on a volcano you will understand this, so I don’t understand the accusatory aspect of the headline.

      Thanks for reading our report!

      Rodger

    • Gordon Hervey says:

      Thanks very much for your reply, I’m browsing a bit to try and find how ‘recent’ the Mt Mihara explosions have been. Apparently the mayor was out of town during the typhoon and took a decision NOT to evacuate Izu. As it turned out, that cost a lot of lives. It would seem to me that the description of ash buildup as ‘recent’ probably means ‘since the previous typhoon’, as otherwise the disaster might have occured then?

  2. Craig Heden says:

    Multiple seismo stations around Mt. Shasta are showing what appears to be episodic “pulses” of activity.
    The amplitude of some events are significantly higher than what I usually see.
    I am in visual contact with Mt. Shasta from my home, and no weather-related phenomena appears present.
    I wonder if this is the beginning/associated of deep-tremor event, or whether there is magmatic movement involved? Or, maybe purely tectonic?
    Maybe Roger can comment if this activity is indeed unusual?

    • Armand Vervaeck says:

      I will surely ask Rodger, Craig – Thanks for commenting

    • Richard Rodger Wilson says:

      Hi Craig,

      I’m pretty sure the pulses (the longer, cigar-shaped signals?) you refer to are actually produced by trains (provided you are looking at the northwest flank and Military Pass seismometers). How do I know this you ask?,…I used to maintain the College of the Siskiyous seismographs way back in the early 1980′s for Mr. Paul Dawson who was the C.O.S. Geology Instructor at that time.

      Thanks for your readership Craig!

      Rodger

    • Craig Heden says:

      Rodger and Armand,
      Thanks for your attention to my question. The two stations I was noting unusual seismo-signals were LMP and LGB. Both stations appear quite a ways away from the railroad. Also, as of now, (10-17-13, 12:36 PDT), both stations indicate different types of activity occurred early in the plot as compared to later on. The time duration for each period of elevated signals is also is quite long. I know how long the freight trains can be up there ( I fish the Cantera loop area often), but the duration of the activity appears too long for even the largest trains? Thanks again if you have any further info or theories to share.

  3. Matthew says:

    Some red on the White Island seismic drum today!
    http://www.geonet.org.nz/p/volcano/drums/latest/wiz-seismic-drum.png
    pretty hard to tell whether there was actually an eruption or not, typical NZ weather!

  4. Paul Wyse says:

    I’m curious about the fact that the main seismograph for Cerro Negro in Nicaragua picks up so many more of the volcanic earthquakes at Momotomobo than any of the other INETER seismographs. Has anyone speculated on a remote plumbing connection between Cerro Negro and Momotombo even though they seem to be a litte too far apart? Telica is certainly much closer to Cerro Negro than Momotombo is and yet it seems that there’s only tectonic earthquakes that seem to show up on both the Cerro Negro and Telica graphs.

    • Richard Rodger Wilson says:

      Hi Paul,

      Sorry it’s taken so long for me to respond to your questions! I’m not that familiar with seismic equipment that INETER has on each of the volcanoes, but the discrepencies you noted in seismic data from adjacent volcanoes usually results from: a) different settings in the gain or amplification of individual stations, and b) the type of seismometers placed on individual volcanoes. For instance, many observatories have switched-over to using broad-band instrumentation at volcanoes during the past decade to detect (just as the name implies) the broader range of seismic wave frequencies generated by volcanoes. The “old school” (i.e. less sensitive) single-component vertical seismometers (but continue to be used) are most sensitive to the relatively high frequencies (> 5Hz) generated by nearby events and have difficulty in detecting special types (low-frequency) of volcanic earthquakes as well as more distant events.

      Hope this helps!
      Rodger

  5. rachael says:

    hello i live twety miles of mount shasta its looms in our view in most siskiyou couny. I dont feel it will blow up no earth quakes here the large earth quake a while ago originating frm lassen was not even noticable my thaughts are that lassen will be going sooner tan later that is not far from here
    George Wilson.. if you ever need photos or information from someone who lives next to mount shasta let me know… your site is so great thanks yu

    • Armand Vervaeck says:

      Thanks George! There was just a small earthquake at Mount Shasta overnight! I used to live in Weed for three years in the early 1980′s. There was alot more activity around Shasta at that time. You are right, it is very quiet for a volcano!

  6. Hi My name is Alex Schmollinger and I’m from Dallas TX and i just want too know is MT. Shasta getting ready too go off and blow it’s top in the 2013 year too come and i was in the Shasta area and i didn’t see any smoke or feel any recent quakes around the big Shasta Volcano so i need someone out there too tell me is Mt Shasta going too go off in 2013 year span or no?

    • Richard Rodger Wilson says:

      Hi Alex,

      Actually, Mount Shasta is one of the “quieter” Cascade volcanoes. There were seismic episodes during the late 1970′s, early 1980′s and again in the early 1990′s that made volcanologists sort of sit up and take notice of Mount Shasta, but since those periods,…the volcano has been relatively silent.

  7. v says:

    “This is likely the result of the infamous “familiarity breeds contempt” syndrome where the local population becomes complacent near a growing lava dome.” The real problem is that the scientists are blind and they suffer from the same syndrome.

    • Richard Rodger Wilson says:

      Hi v,

      Not so much the scientists being blind in this case. We are all to some extent free to (…and guilty of) ignore clear warning signs in all sorts of circumstances.

Speak Your Mind

*

Smartphone version