Bardarbunga volcano (Iceland) update(s) September 1 – A continuing strong fissure eruption

Last update: September 1, 2014 at 9:33 am by By

After Rodger Wilson was obliged to discontinue his daily participation at this site, we have decided to start up an El Hierro type article. The newest additions will always be on top and if the article gets too long, we will cut off a part of it and archive it. This url will always be the one to follow and if you leave our page open in your browser, the page will refresh every 15 minutes automatically.
Please be a little patient with this new format.
This report is compiled out of many information sources.

For our El Hierro volcano report : Click here


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Bárðarbunga update September 1 08:57 UTC
The image below is a map drawn on the basis of the hourly flyover of the NOAA and NASA heat detection satellites. The different colors are showing the start of the eruption

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Bárðarbunga update September 1 07:57 UTC
01st September 2014 06:45 – from geoscientist on duty
The activity around Bárðarbunga from midnight 1. September until 06:50:
Volcanic activity in Holuhraun:
The fissure eruption is continuing at a stable level. No explosive activity is observed, the eruption remains an effusive lava eruption. Visual observation by webcam and low level volcanic tremor on seismometers do not show any obvious changes since evening. More detailled information will soon follow from scientists in the field.
Seismic activity:
Around 250 earthquakes have been automatically detected until now. Most of them are located in the northern part of the magma intrusion, between the eruption site and south to about 10 km into Dynjujökull. Strongest events were up to around magnitude 2. The rate of events has decreased as a result of pressure release due to the eruption, but there is still ongoing continuous seismicity.
Several events have occurred around the Bárðarbunga caldera rim, strongest events were M4.2 at 03:09 on the southern rim and M4.5 at 04:59 on the northern rim.
In the broader Askja region, most events were located at Herðubreiðartögl, the strongest event there was M2.9 at 02:56. This area is a quite common place for seismic activity, the activity now is not necessarily caused by increased stress due to the intrusion (the tip of the intrusion is about 25 km SW of this cluster). Askja volcano itself was seismically quiet.

Bárðarbunga update September 1 06:57 UTC
No new scientist bulletin this morning.
The eruption continues at full flow. Bardarbunga2 webcam now zoomed out.
Wind direction is opposite from yesterday but as the lava contains almost no ash, this is not important for the population, even better like it is now.

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Bárðarbunga update August 31 23:02 UTC
Amazing photo of Holuhraun #eruption taken this evening by @uni_iceland staff @gislio

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Bárðarbunga update August 31 21:48 UTC
* The highest lava fountains are about 70m high. The temperature of the lava is about 1200°C (~2200°F).
* Until scientists downgrade danger of eruption starting under glacier then area north of Bardarbunga will be closed to cars and hikers
* Scientists warn that this cycle of eruptions can last until next year or longer. Great excuse to visit Iceland
* Scientists have revised amount of magma coming up to 250 m3/s – the lava is flowing NE at a rate of 1/2-1 m/minute

Bárðarbunga update August 31 21:01 UTC
WOW, what a show now at the webcam now.  http://www.livefromiceland.is/webcams/bardarbunga-2/

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Bárðarbunga update August 31 20:41 UTC
And finally a great video recorded by Rob Green, one of the people who have the great task to do field work (yes, we are jealous :)

Bárðarbunga update August 31 20:34 UTC
31st August 2014 18:21
Few additional facts since status report earlier today:
* Now about 700 earthquakes have been detected since midnight.
* An earthquake M4.9 occurred at 16:12 on the northern rim of the Bárðarbunga caldera.
* The main seismic activity has been in the intrusive dike. Only a few quakes have been located near the caldera rim, mostly its northern part.
* Little seismic activity has been near Askja but some seismic activity near Herðubreiðartögl.
* Weather conditions; very windy (Yes, we know that – we are almost seasick :)

Bárðarbunga update August 31 20:30 UTC
Sequence at 10:15 UTC on Sunday August 31 2014 – The length of the fissure was approx. 1.5 km and the lava flow was calculated at 1000 cubic meter per second. Lava fountains and flowing Pahoehoe lava is clearly visible on this video and is reaching a maximum height of 60 meter – Video courtesy Mila, livefromIceland.is webcam

Bárðarbunga update August 31 17:10 UTC
Acceptable “still” Mila webcam picture from the fissure eruption made a couple of minutes ago.
Watching the LIVE webcam will make you more seasick than a cruise journey on the oceans :)

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Bárðarbunga update August 31 17:07 UTC
In our category “nice to know” (Askja is a volcano to the North-West of Bardarbunga – see map below)

Bárðarbunga update August 31 16:47 UTC
31st August 2014 14:45 – from meteorologist on duty
Visibility to the eruption site is now good. No ash has has been detected. The Aviation Color Code for Bárðarbunga has therefore been reset to ‘orange’ and the code for Askja is still at ‘yellow’.

Bárðarbunga update August 31 16:00 UTC
31st August 2014 12:07 – from the Scientific Advisory Board
Scientists from the Icelandic Met Office and the Institute of Earth Sciences and representatives of the Civil Protection in Iceland attend the meetings of the Scientific Advisory Board of the Icelandic Civil Protection.
Conclusions of the Scientific Advisory Board of the Icelandic Civil Protection:
* A lava eruption started in Holuhraun shortly after 04 AM, on the same volcanic fissure, which erupted earlier this week. The fissure is estimated to be 1,5 km long. It was detected on Míla´s web-camera at 05:51 AM.
* Fewer earthquakes seem to follow the event than in the previous eruption, but more lava is being extruded.
* At 07 AM the lava flow was around 1 km wide and 3 km long towards northeast.
* The thickness was estimated a few meters, the flow about 1000 m3 pr second.
* Approximately 500 earthquakes were detected in the area and smaller than before. The strongest earthquake, M3.8 was in the Bárðarbunga caldera. Poor weather conditions prevail in the area, which makes detection of smaller earthquakes difficult.
* GPS measurements show continued movements north of Dyngjujökull.
* Gas emissions rise to a few hundred meters above the fissure.
* Weather conditions make it difficult to follow the progression of the eruption, but scientists are in the area, using every opportunity to acquire information on gas and lava outflow.
* Weather conditions do not allow overflight at this time. The opportunity to fly over the area will be assessed later today.
From the Icelandic Met Office:
* The Aviation Colour Code for Bárðarbunga is at ‘red’ and the code for Askja at ‘yellow’.

Map courtesy and copyright @RUVfrettir

Map courtesy and copyright @RUVfrettir

Bárðarbunga update August 31 13:12 UTC
A lot of people are still struggling with the location of the Holuhraum eruption site versus the Bardarbunga, Kverkfjoll and Askja volcanoes. The map below shows them all 4

Click on the image to go to the website of this great very detailed map

Click on the image to go to the website of this great very detailed map

Bárðarbunga update August 31 13:12 UTC

Bárðarbunga update August 31 13:07 UTC
- The eruption started around 0400. Lava is flowing at around 1000 m3/s and is 1kmx3km wide. Still ongoing
- The stronger earthquakes are still happening outside the erupting fissure area, at the Bardarbunga caldera. A little earlier the strongest one today, with a preliminary value of 4.8. (Update : IMO reports a M5.1 at a depth of 5.2 km – IMO has a lot of instruments in the area and will have always the best results in Iceland (this message for those among you who think that USGS is always the most accurate :) ))
- Below an image from the University of Iceland of the fresh Pahoehoe lava

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Bárðarbunga update August 31 12:34 UTC
Okay, we agree that the video below which we captured from the Mila Bardarbunga 2 webcam in a rare moment of relative clarity is not what we want, but at least you can clearly see the lava fountains dancing in the wind. They are spouting up to 60 meters high (the webcam has a big zoom)

Bárðarbunga update August 31 11:03 UTC
The image below shows the risks scientists are taking in coming as near as possible to the eruption site. In a fissure eruption nobody knows where exactly the fissure will surface. It is a calculated risk of course but a calculation with a number of unknown parameters.  Must be a literally thrilling sensation.
A scientific report will arrive soon (scientific committee meeting now)

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Bárðarbunga update August 31 10:27 UTC
@almannavarnir : Fissure est. 1.5 km with lava flowing 3 km east, lava fountains. Now a storm is going over the area and very low visibility.

Bárðarbunga update August 31 10:25 UTC
I am again obliged to cut a part of this article as Bardarbunga and Tavurvur made it too long, but extremely interesting at the same time.
August 27 and 28 have now been archived – see link below to consult it

Bárðarbunga update August 31 09:52 UTC
Pahoehoe lava (Yes, the Hawaiian type and name) flow this morning, in Iceland also called “helluhraun”. Pictures by Ármann Höskuldsson via @uni_iceland
For those who not know the lava types – 2 main categories a) Pahoehoe lava (smooth, unbroken) and b) AA lava (very brittle)

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AA lava

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Pahoehoe lava

These images were taken by scientists who were very close to the fissure location. They have now pulled back because of the bad weather.  Fire fountains go as high as 60 meters.

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Bárðarbunga update August 31 09:36 UTC
- Weather conditions in the Holuhraun #eruption area make it difficult for everyone to monitor progress. Scientists have left the area.
- The fissure is about 1.5 km long, fire up to 60m in the air. Still no threat. Fly ban only up to 6000 feet.
- Domestic flights have been grounded due to weather conditions, not the eruption.

Bárðarbunga update August 31 08:44 UTC
NO science updates since yesterday
Scientists from IMO were installing additional sensors in the area near Holuhraun yesterday evening
Tremor is of course higher than before the eruption
The University of Iceland had analyzed the lava from the first eruption (same kind of lava now). Click here for details.
Scientists say “fissure longer than before.. picture below is from Benni” who was installing instrument

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Bárðarbunga update August 31 08:03 UTC
If you cannot link to the Mila webcam, you are certainly not the only one. The network is once again saturated.
Part of the Icelandic air space is again forbidden to fly over. The ash emission from the fissure eruption is limited but nevertheless it could suddenly increase of course.

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Bárðarbunga update August 31 06:27 UTC
This morning a new fissure eruption started in the same Holuhraun area as the first one. The webcam view is often obscured by the dand and dust in front of the fissure area. We expect the length of the fissure to be a little longer than the first one

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Bárðarbunga update August 30 22:13 UTC
30th August 2014 18:34 – from geoscientist on duty
Over 1100 earthquakes have been detected since midnight 29/30 August until 18:30; the vast majority in the northern part of the dyke intrusion, see maps.
As this morning, the active part of the dyke intrusion extends from about 4 km south of the glacier margin of Dyngjujökull to the location of yesterday’s fissure eruption. There is no sign of northwards migration of the intrusion.
No large events (M>4) have been detected near the Bárðarbunga caldera since this morning. One event of M2.1 was detected at the northern caldera rim at 13:40. Few small events were detected around Askja volcano.
Summarizing, no significant changes in seismic activity have been observed.

Tavurvur  Papua New Guinea August 30 14:27 UTC
Susie McGrade, the owner of Rabaul Hotel close to Mount Tavurvur, was speaking to The World live on Friday night when the volcano emitted one of its sonic booms. Click on the image to be linked to the video page

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Bárðarbunga update August 30 14:18 UTC
WOW!, thats what we say after watching a great NEW 3D seismic model from IMO – It visualizes the depth of the earthquakes and highlights the activity spots. Congratz to IMO Iceland for this great tool!. Click here and enjoy playing with it.

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Bárðarbunga update August 30 13:10 UTC
30th August 2014 11:45 – from the Scientific Advisory Board
Scientists from the Icelandic Met Office and the Institute of Earth Sciences and representatives of the Civil Protection in Iceland attend the meetings of the Scientific Advisory Board of the Icelandic Civil Protection.
Conclusions of the Scientific Advisory Board of the Icelandic Civil Protection:
* Earthquake activity continues on a 15-km-long region of the dyke intrusion, extending both into the Dyngjujökull glacier and the region north of the ice margin.
* Earthquakes have not migrated northwards during the last two days.
* Seismicity remains high and, since midnight, about 700 earthquakes have been detected in the region.
* The largest earthquakes since midnight include: (i) a magnitude 4.5 event on the northern side of the Bárðarbunga caldera at 02:35 UTC; (ii) a magnitude 4.2 earthquake in the same region at 06:18 UTC; and (iii) a magnitude 5.4 earthquake on the south-eastern edge of the Bárðarbunga caldera at 07:03 UTC.
* During the last two weeks, several earthquakes of similar size have occurred on the edge of the Bárðarbunga caldera. These earthquakes are interpreted as signs of stress changes in the region of the caldera.
* Over 20 micro-earthquakes have been detected in the Askja region. It is thought that these earthquakes have occurred due to stress changes north of the dyke intrusion.
* GPS measurements show continued horizontal movements north of Vatnajökull due to formation of the dyke intrusion on the northern edge of the ice-cap.
* No unusual changes in the discharge or electrical conductivity of Jökulsá á Fjöllum have been detected. The same applies to other rivers draining from north-western Vatnajökull.
* A sample of newly erupted lava was taken from Holuhraun yesterday; analysis is ongoing.
There are no indications that the intensity of the activity declining.
At this moment it is unclear how the situation will develop. However, four scenarios are considered most likely:
*** The migration of magma could stop, resulting in a gradual reduction in seismic activity and no further eruptions.
*** The dike could reach the Earth’s surface north of Dyngjujökull causing another eruption, possibly on a new fissure. Such an eruption could include lava flow and (or) explosive activity.
*** The intrusion reaches the surface and an eruption occurs again where either the fissure is partly or entirely beneath Dyngjujökull. This would most likely produce a flood in Jökulsá á Fjöllum and perhaps explosive, ash-producing activity.
*** An eruption in Bárðarbunga. The eruption could cause an outburst flood and possibly an explosive, ash-producing activity. In the event of a subglacial eruption, it is most likely that flooding would affect Jökulsá á Fjöllum. However it is not possible to exclude the following flood paths: Skjálfandafljót, Kaldakvísl, Skaftá and Grímsvötn.
Other scenarios cannot be excluded.
From the Icelandic Met Office:
The Aviation Colour Code for Bárðarbunga remains at ‘orange’ and the code for Askja at ‘yellow’.

Bárðarbunga update August 30 11:12 UTC
Scientists say this activity in/near Bardarbunga may last years like Krafla eruptions did in 1975-84 Source : Gisli Olafsonn, Civil Protection Iceland

Bárðarbunga update August 30 11:01 UTC
Great picture of the ash fallout after historic eruptions of the Bardarbunga volcano. Wind direction is of course the most important reason the ash loads landed in different areas. Some thicknesses are really spectacular and reach as far as Reykjavik. These eruption where eruptions of the volcano itself, no fissure eruptions like we witnessed earlier this week. Map via a tweet from John A Stevenson alias @volcan01010

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Tavurvur  Papua New Guinea August 30 08:27 UTC
Volcanic activity at Mt Tavurvur is settling down as locals near Rabaul begin the ash clean up
What a beautiful picture. The most beautiful pictures are taken by a professional photographer who happened to be in Rabaul during the eruption. They are now sold for a lot of money to press agencies. Unfortunately i was not around at the time, otherwise they would have been free to distribute :). Click here for 4 beautiful images in a Dutch press article.

Bárðarbunga update August 30 07:57 UTC
30th August 2014 07:20 – from geoscientist on duty
Around 450 earthquakes have been detected since midnight 29/30 August until 07:00, the vast majority in the northern part of the dike intrusion, see map below.
The active part of the dike intrusion extends from about 4 km south of the glacier margin of Dyngjujökull to the location of yesterday’s fissure eruption. Only a few small earthquakes have been located north of the eruption site and there is no sign now of northwards migration of the intrusion. Strongest events in this area were M2.7 at 03:01 and M2.8 at 06:19.
Several events have been detected on the caldera rim of Bárðarbunga, strongest were M4.5 at 02:35 and M4.2 at 06:18, both on the northern rim. A magnitude M5.4 earthquake occurred at 07:03 at the southern rim of Bárðarbunga caldera. Several events of similar size have occurred around the caldera rim in recent days. They are interpreted as being related to subsidence of the volcano due to volume decrease in the magma chamber beneath.
A few small events were detected around Askja volcano. Summarizing, no significant changes in seismic activity have been observed.

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Bárðarbunga update August 30 07:50 UTC
IMO Iceland has now reported a Magnitude of 5.4 at a depth of 2.9 km below Bardarbunga.  This is shallower than most of the Bardarbunga edifice earthquakes but not the first one. Thursday there was a M5.0 at 3 km depth in the same area.

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Bárðarbunga update August 30 07:29 UTC
New M+5 earthquakes below the glacier.
USGS did report M5.4 but the USGS data have a too big error margin to point to the exact location. At the time of writing the earthquake was not listed yet at IMO.
The map shows 2 epicenters, thats the error margin i was talking about, both points refer to the same earthquake as reported by different seismological agencies
In the meantime the Mila webcams are showing clouds. If something would happen know only locals will hear it and airplanes will see it :)

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Bárðarbunga update August 29 22:35 UTC
Þorbjörg Ágústsdóttir, a doctoral student in geophysics at the University of Cambridge, was the first person to hold an chunk of the new lava. A lot of analyzing work ahead

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Bárðarbunga update August 29 21:42 UTC
29th August 2014 18:30 – from geoscientist on duty
Little changes since the status report, earlier today. An earthquake M4,1 occurred at 16:27 on the northern rim of Bárðarbunga caldera. The number of earthquakes from the automatic network is similar as at the same time yesterday, about 1200 earthquakes.

Bárðarbunga update August 29 17:27 UTC
29th August 2014 16:20 – Status report
Overall assessment from the joint status report 290814 of the Icelandic Met Office and the University of Iceland, Institute of Earth Sciences:
At this moment it is unclear how the situation will develop. However, three scenarios are considered most likely:
* The migration of magma could stop, resulting in a gradual reduction in seismic activity and no further eruptions.
* The dike could reach the Earth’s surface north of Dyngjujökull causing another eruption, possibly on a new fissure. Such an eruption could include lava flow and (or) explosive activity.
* The intrusion reaches the surface and an eruption occurs again where either the fissure is partly or entirely beneath Dyngjujökull. This would most likely produce a flood in Jökulsá á Fjöllum and perhaps explosive, ash-producing activity. At 10:00 UTC, IMO changed the Aviation Colour Code for Bárðarbunga to ‘orange’, signifying that significant emission of ash into the atmosphere is unlikely.
The aviation colour-code for the Askja volcano remains at ‘yellow’.
Other scenarios cannot be excluded. For example, an eruption inside the Bárdarbunga caldera.

Tavurvur  Papua New Guinea August 29 15:06 UTC
Video of the PNG governor who is managing the evacuation of nearby locations.
The volcano is blowing more ash into the air
Below this video from the authorities another video showing a harmless eruption on January 20 2013. The volcano is very close to Rabaul, one of the bigger cities in PNG and often visited by Cruise Ships :)

 

Bárðarbunga update August 29 14:45 UTC
29th August 2014 12:20 – from the Scientific Advisory Board
Scientists from the Icelandic Met Office and the Institute of Earth Sciences, and representatives of the Civil Protection in Iceland, attend the meetings of the Advisory Board.
Conclusions of the Scientific Advisory Board:
* At 00:02 UTC signs of a lava eruption were detected on web camera images from Mila. The web-camera is located at Vaðalda, north-east of the eruption site.
* Around midnight, weak signs of increased tremor were apparent on IMO’s seismic stations near to the eruption site.
* At 00:20 UTC scientists in the field from the Icelandic Met Office, Institute of Earth Sciences and Cambridge University confirmed the location of the eruption.
* The eruption occurred on an old volcanic fissure on the Holuhraun lava field, about 5 km north of the Dyngjujökull ice margin. The active fissure was about 600 m in length.
* A small amount of lava drained from the fissure and by around 04:00 UTC, lava flow is thought to have stopped.
* According to seismic data and web-camera imagery, the eruption peaked between 00:40 and 01:00 UTC.
* At the beginning of the eruption, seismic activity decreased, although seismicity has since returned to levels observed in recent days.
* Aerial observations by the Icelandic Coastguard show that only steam is rising from the site of the lava eruption.
* There are no indications that the intensity of the activity is declining.
* At this moment it is unclear how the situation will develop. However, three scenarios are considered most likely:
*** The migration of magma could stop, resulting in a gradual reduction in seismic activity and no further eruptions.
*** The dike could reach the Earth’s surface north of Dyngjujökull causing another eruption, possibly on a new fissure. Such an eruption could include lava flow and (or) explosive activity.
*** The intrusion reaches the surface and an eruption occurs again where either the fissure is partly or entirely beneath Dyngjujökull. This would most likely produce a flood in Jökulsá á Fjöllum and perhaps explosive, ash-producing activity.
*** Other scenarios cannot be excluded. For example, an eruption inside the Bárdarbunga caldera.

Bárðarbunga update August 29 14:40 UTC
RED alert has been changed to ORANGE again above the Bardarbunga, Dyngjujökull, Vatnajökull area.
Official statement :
From the Icelandic Met Office:
At 10:00 UTC, IMO changed the Aviation Colour Code for Bárðarbunga to ‘orange’, signifying that significant emission of ash into the atmosphere is unlikely. The aviation color-code for the Askja volcano remains at ‘yellow’.

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Bárðarbunga update August 29 13:58 UTC
The Icelandic Coast Guard surveillance plane TF-SIF flew over the eruption site this morning.
The crew took the above thermal image of the fissure. According to the Coast Guard, and contrary to initial reports who stated that the fissure was only 100 meters long (based on webcam estimates), the fissure measures 900 meters (3,000 feet) in length and is 5 km (3 miles) from Dyngjujökull, Vatnajökull outlet glacier.

Seismicity above M3 since midnight UTC

Seismicity above M3 since midnight UTC

Bárðarbunga update August 29 12:53 UTC
29th August 2014 11:58 – The new eruption in Holuhraun
Below are two photos of the new lava in Holuhraun, 5-10 km north of Dyngjujökull. The photos were taken from TF-Sif, the aeroplane of the Icelandic Coast Guard.

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Tavurvur volcano erupts in Papua New Guinea August 29 10:29 UTC
Below some (probably smartphone) video footage of the eruption.

Bárðarbunga update August 29 09:22 UTC
Click on the image below to watch a short video of the overflight of the fissure zone

Click on this image to watch the overflight video

Click on this image to watch the overflight video

Bárðarbunga update August 29 09:14 UTC
29th August 2014 07:10 -from geoscientist on duty
* Seismic activity has decreased as a result of the pressure release, however a significant amount of earthquakes is still detected in the magma dike, between the eruption site and south to about 5 km into Dyngjujökull.
* Strongest events were 3.8 in the caldera of Bárðarbunga at 04:37, as well as 2.9 at 05:39 and 3.5 at 06:38 in the dike. These earthquake are very closely monitored, but no significant change volcanic activity following these has been observed so far.

FYI – we will cut part of this page and archive it because it is really getting too long :) – DONE

Tavurvur volcano erupts in Papua New Guinea August 29 08:11 UTC
A spectacular eruption with huge amounts of ash and firework
First major eruption after 20 years!
Some facts : Tavurvur is an active stratovolcano that lies near Rabaul in Papua New Guinea. It is a sub-vent of the Rabaul caldera and lies on the eastern rim of the larger feature. An eruption of the volcano largely destroyed the nearby town of Rabaul in 1994. Mount Tavurvur is the most active volcano in Rabaul caldera. On 7 October 2006 the volcano erupted again, and an initial blast shattered windows up to 12 kilometres away and sent an ash plume 18 km into the stratosphere. Winds blew most of the ash away from Rabaul.

Image screenshot from a twiter account

Image screenshot from a twitter account

 

 


 

Bárðarbunga update August 29 07:38 UTC
All airports in Iceland are open although an eruption has begun near Vatnajökull.
A recording from a couple of minutes ago at the Mila Bardarbunga 2 webcam

Bárðarbunga update August 29 07:26 UTC
Around 40 #SAR personnel from Landsbjorg providing assistance in closing down all routes to the (dangerous) eruption area Why? Because a dyke can open everywhere in that area, also under your own car or feet Temperature 1200 °C

Bárðarbunga update August 29 06:30 UTC
The fissure is now thought to be 100m long with low lava fountains with thin flowing lava. #Holuhraun
(Zoomed) Image from a couple of minutes ago below Webcam address

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Bárðarbunga update August 29 05:22 UTC
Someone captured the eruption on the Mila webcam. This is an image in 1/1, not zoomed like below. We will soon see the size of the fissure during daylight

Bárðarbunga update August 29 04:42 UTC
Below the image right now at the Mila webcam. The camera is zooming in on the eruption spot which explains the quality. Weather is not really good at the moment and it still partly darkness

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Bárðarbunga update August 29 04:20 UTC
29th August 2014 02:45 – An eruption north of Dyngjujökull
An eruption started in Holuhraun north of Dyngjujökull at around 00:02.
Seismic tremor was observed on all seismic stations and the web camera installed in the area by Mila has showed some nice pictures of the eruption.
It is a small fissure eruption and at 02:40 AM the activity appears to have decreased.
ER : This is a very small fissure eruption with almost NO ash content, more or less like a few holes in the ground. The area is unpopulated and only the Mila webcam has recorded it.

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OLDER ARCHIVED PARTS OF THIS REPORT :
2013 : July 8 – July 31
2013 : June 24 – July 7
2013 : June 8 – June 23
2013 : May 26 – June 7
2013 : June 8 – August 20
2013 : August 21 – October 27
2013 : October 28 – December 12
2013 : December 13 – January 30
2014 : February 1 – May 20
2014 : May 21 – August 20
2014 : August 21 – August 28 (Bardarbunga volcano Iceland)

Comments

  1. Gordon Hervey says:

    October 18 2013 UTC
    I always enjoy these reports and wanted to ask a question that I have also posted on Volcano Monitor. Japan Today has an Oct 18 article “Izu Oshima mayor under fire for not issuing evacuation orders.” A Tokyo Uni expert is quoted “the top layer of volcanic ash from recent explosions had been washed off by the massive rainfall….knocking down trees and…houses”. Dozens still missing or dead. My point is that the local volcano Mount Mihara must have had frequent explosions, yet I have not seen the name before now on any listings, anywhere. Modis data problems, Japan keeping secrets, what could this sort of thing imply?

    • Richard Rodger Wilson says:

      Hi Gordon,

      You have to remember, when a volcanologist (geologist) says “recent” he may be referring to an event that has occurred during the last 10,000 years! Mount Mihara has in fact erupted more recently (in a big way in 1986!) to produce exposed ash layers on the island. Regardless of their age, fragmental volcanic deposits are always susceptible to remobilization from heavy rains. If you live any time on a volcano you will understand this, so I don’t understand the accusatory aspect of the headline.

      Thanks for reading our report!

      Rodger

    • Gordon Hervey says:

      Thanks very much for your reply, I’m browsing a bit to try and find how ‘recent’ the Mt Mihara explosions have been. Apparently the mayor was out of town during the typhoon and took a decision NOT to evacuate Izu. As it turned out, that cost a lot of lives. It would seem to me that the description of ash buildup as ‘recent’ probably means ‘since the previous typhoon’, as otherwise the disaster might have occured then?

  2. Craig Heden says:

    Multiple seismo stations around Mt. Shasta are showing what appears to be episodic “pulses” of activity.
    The amplitude of some events are significantly higher than what I usually see.
    I am in visual contact with Mt. Shasta from my home, and no weather-related phenomena appears present.
    I wonder if this is the beginning/associated of deep-tremor event, or whether there is magmatic movement involved? Or, maybe purely tectonic?
    Maybe Roger can comment if this activity is indeed unusual?

    • Armand Vervaeck says:

      I will surely ask Rodger, Craig – Thanks for commenting

    • Richard Rodger Wilson says:

      Hi Craig,

      I’m pretty sure the pulses (the longer, cigar-shaped signals?) you refer to are actually produced by trains (provided you are looking at the northwest flank and Military Pass seismometers). How do I know this you ask?,…I used to maintain the College of the Siskiyous seismographs way back in the early 1980′s for Mr. Paul Dawson who was the C.O.S. Geology Instructor at that time.

      Thanks for your readership Craig!

      Rodger

    • Craig Heden says:

      Rodger and Armand,
      Thanks for your attention to my question. The two stations I was noting unusual seismo-signals were LMP and LGB. Both stations appear quite a ways away from the railroad. Also, as of now, (10-17-13, 12:36 PDT), both stations indicate different types of activity occurred early in the plot as compared to later on. The time duration for each period of elevated signals is also is quite long. I know how long the freight trains can be up there ( I fish the Cantera loop area often), but the duration of the activity appears too long for even the largest trains? Thanks again if you have any further info or theories to share.

  3. Matthew says:

    Some red on the White Island seismic drum today!
    http://www.geonet.org.nz/p/volcano/drums/latest/wiz-seismic-drum.png
    pretty hard to tell whether there was actually an eruption or not, typical NZ weather!

  4. Paul Wyse says:

    I’m curious about the fact that the main seismograph for Cerro Negro in Nicaragua picks up so many more of the volcanic earthquakes at Momotomobo than any of the other INETER seismographs. Has anyone speculated on a remote plumbing connection between Cerro Negro and Momotombo even though they seem to be a litte too far apart? Telica is certainly much closer to Cerro Negro than Momotombo is and yet it seems that there’s only tectonic earthquakes that seem to show up on both the Cerro Negro and Telica graphs.

    • Richard Rodger Wilson says:

      Hi Paul,

      Sorry it’s taken so long for me to respond to your questions! I’m not that familiar with seismic equipment that INETER has on each of the volcanoes, but the discrepencies you noted in seismic data from adjacent volcanoes usually results from: a) different settings in the gain or amplification of individual stations, and b) the type of seismometers placed on individual volcanoes. For instance, many observatories have switched-over to using broad-band instrumentation at volcanoes during the past decade to detect (just as the name implies) the broader range of seismic wave frequencies generated by volcanoes. The “old school” (i.e. less sensitive) single-component vertical seismometers (but continue to be used) are most sensitive to the relatively high frequencies (> 5Hz) generated by nearby events and have difficulty in detecting special types (low-frequency) of volcanic earthquakes as well as more distant events.

      Hope this helps!
      Rodger

  5. rachael says:

    hello i live twety miles of mount shasta its looms in our view in most siskiyou couny. I dont feel it will blow up no earth quakes here the large earth quake a while ago originating frm lassen was not even noticable my thaughts are that lassen will be going sooner tan later that is not far from here
    George Wilson.. if you ever need photos or information from someone who lives next to mount shasta let me know… your site is so great thanks yu

    • Armand Vervaeck says:

      Thanks George! There was just a small earthquake at Mount Shasta overnight! I used to live in Weed for three years in the early 1980′s. There was alot more activity around Shasta at that time. You are right, it is very quiet for a volcano!

  6. Hi My name is Alex Schmollinger and I’m from Dallas TX and i just want too know is MT. Shasta getting ready too go off and blow it’s top in the 2013 year too come and i was in the Shasta area and i didn’t see any smoke or feel any recent quakes around the big Shasta Volcano so i need someone out there too tell me is Mt Shasta going too go off in 2013 year span or no?

    • Richard Rodger Wilson says:

      Hi Alex,

      Actually, Mount Shasta is one of the “quieter” Cascade volcanoes. There were seismic episodes during the late 1970′s, early 1980′s and again in the early 1990′s that made volcanologists sort of sit up and take notice of Mount Shasta, but since those periods,…the volcano has been relatively silent.

  7. v says:

    “This is likely the result of the infamous “familiarity breeds contempt” syndrome where the local population becomes complacent near a growing lava dome.” The real problem is that the scientists are blind and they suffer from the same syndrome.

    • Richard Rodger Wilson says:

      Hi v,

      Not so much the scientists being blind in this case. We are all to some extent free to (…and guilty of) ignore clear warning signs in all sorts of circumstances.

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