Wordwide volcano and earthquake news – La Réunion, Piton de la Fournaise volcano erupted (video)

Last update: June 21, 2014 at 8:59 am by By

After Rodger Wilson was obliged to discontinue his daily participation at this site, we have decided to start up an El Hierro type article. The newest additions will always be on top and if the article gets too long, we will cut off a part of it and archive it. This url will always be the one to follow and if you leave our page open in your browser, the page will refresh every 60 minutes automatically.
Please be a little patient with this new format.
This report is compiled out of many information sources.

For our El Hierro volcano report : Click here


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Piton de la Fournaise volcano erupted (La Réunion) - (June 21)
- It is currently bad weather at the summit of the volcano. During better weather you can see a number of live webcam images here

The eruption is not spectacular but shows 2 craters in eruption + a number of lava streams slowly finding their way (to the ocean?). They appear not to be powerful enough to reach the ocean. Neither can lava tubes be seen. The volcano has a lot of lava tubes and eruptions regularly reach the ocean (Hawaii type of eruptions).
The volcano was set to a higher alert on June 12 after seismicity started to increase. People were had to stay on prepared trails. Good work from the volcanologists!

Click on this picture to be linked with the VIDEO page (could not be embedded)

Click on this picture to be linked with the VIDEO page (could not be embedded)


 

Increased seismicity at La Réunion’s, Piton de la Fournaise volcano
The Piton de la Fournaise volcano is located in increased alert since today Thursday, June 12, 2014.
The current increase in seismicity is seen as a possible precursor of an eruption.
It is not expected that this will happen in the next few hours as admittance to the crater area is still tolerated but hikers are requested to stay on the marked trails.

Image courtesy and copyright http://reunion.orange.fr

Image courtesy and copyright http://reunion.orange.fr


 

Volcano activity for the week of June 4, 2014 until June 10 (June 11)
The Weekly Volcanic Activity Report is a cooperative project between the Smithsonian’s Global Volcanism Program and the US Geological Survey’s Volcano Hazards Program.

New Activity/Unrest
Pavlof  | United States
AVO reported that the Strombolian eruption at Pavlof continued during 3-10 June. On 3 June the FAA webcam showed a high steam plume rising above a vent on the NE flank and lower-level ash from pyroclastic flows on the N flank. During 3-4 June seismicity remained unchanged and persistent elevated surface temperatures were detected in satellite images. A steam plume with minor amounts of ash but rich in sulfur dioxide drifted 100 km W. Incandescence from lava fountaining was visible in webcam images on 4 June. According to a news article, flights in and out of Cold Bay and Unalaska were canceled on 4 June, affecting about 200 people.
Two strong explosions were detected by the seismic network at 0205 and 0245 on 5 June. Lightning was detected by the World Wide Lightning Location Network indicating the presence of ash; satellite images did not detected ash above the meteorological cloud tops at about 8.5 km (28,000 ft) a.s.l. A third event was detected at 0844. The level of activity declined during 5-6 June; ash emissions appeared to be greatly reduced although cloud cover continued to obscure satellite views. Elevated surface temperatures were observed in mostly cloudy satellite images during 8-9 June. The Aviation Color Code remained at Orange and the Volcano Alert Level remained at Watch.

San Miguel  | El Salvador
According to SNET in a report from 1 June, the Ministerio de Medio Ambiente y Recursos Naturales (MARN) reported that seismicity at San Miguel remained high. Locals observed more intense gas plumes rising from the crater with occasional and minor amounts of ash, especially after rain. Rumbling was also reported.

Sangeang Api  | Indonesia
Based on analyses of satellite imagery and wind data, the Darwin VAAC reported that during 4-7 June ash plumes from Sangeang Api rose to an altitude of 3 km (10,000 ft) a.s.l. and drifted 45-110 km W and NW.

Santa María  | Guatemala
On 6 June INSIVUMEH reported that the Santiaguito Observatory (OBSAN) was seriously affected by a large lahar that descended the Nima I river drainage on the S flank of Santa María’s Santiaguito lava-dome complex. The lahar came in waves, 5-9 m high, was 80 m wide, and carried blocks up to 5 m in diameter. It overtopped the river banks and flowed to a nearby farm. The staff working at OBSAN had to evacuate; some important scientific equipment was lost and damaged. On 7 June a lahar descended the Samala river, a tributary of the Nima I river, carrying blocks up to 1 m in diameter, and lahars in the Nima I drainage had a sulfur odor. During 7-8 June slow-moving lava flows descended the E flank. Explosions during 8-9 June generated ash plumes that rose 500 m and drifted SW. Large avalanches in the collapsed area were incandescent at night. During 9-10 June explosions generated white and gray plumes that rose 500 m, the lava flows on the E flank produced avalanches, and Domo del Brujo began degassing.

Zhupanovsky  | Eastern Kamchatka (Russia)
KVERT reported that an eruption at Zhupanovsky began on 6 June, producing an ash plume that rose to an altitude of 6 km (19,900 ft) a.s.l., as suggested by Tokyo VAAC and UHPP notices. Cloud cover prevented views from satellite. The Aviation Color Code was raised to Yellow. Satellite images on 9 June showed ash plumes rising to altitudes of 3-4 km (9,800-13,100 ft) a.s.l. and drifting 60 km E.

Ongoing Activity
Aira  | Kyushu (Japan)
JMA reported that during 19-23 May two explosions from Showa Crater at Aira Caldera’s Sakurajima volcano ejected tephra that landed as far as 1,300 m away. Incandescence from the crater was detected at night during 19-20 May. The Alert Level remained at 3 (on a scale of 1-5). The Tokyo VAAC reported that on 6 and 9 June plumes rose to altitudes of 2.1-5.5 km (7,000-18,000 ft) a.s.l. Plumes drifted NW on 9 June.

Bagana  | Bougainville (Papua New Guinea)
Based on analyses of satellite imagery and wind data, the Darwin VAAC reported that on 10 June an ash plume from Bagana rose to an altitude of 2.4 km (8,000 ft) a.s.l. and drifted over 35 km SW.

Batu Tara  | Komba Island (Indonesia)
Based on analyses of satellite imagery and wind data, the Darwin VAAC reported that on 6 June an ash plume from Batu Tara rose to an altitude of 2.1 km (7,000 ft) a.s.l. and drifted 150 km NW. During 7-9 June ash plumes rose to an altitude of 2.1 km (7,000 ft) a.s.l. and drifted over 35 km NW and W.

Chirinkotan  | Kuril Islands (Russia)
SVERT reported that an eruption at Chirinkotan had begun on 24 May; thermal anomalies and gas emissions sometimes containing ash were detected in satellite images. On 5 June seldom and weak thermal anomalies suggested cooling lava flows. The Aviation Color Code was lowered to Green.

Chirpoi  | Kuril Islands (Russia)
In a 5 June report, SVERT summarized activity at Snow, a volcano of Chirpoi, over the previous two years: an effusive eruption started on 10 November 2012, producing steam-and-gas emissions and thermal anomalies thorough April 2013; the volcano was quiet; steam-and-gas emissions and thermal anomalies were again detected starting on 12 July 2013, suggesting a new period of lava effusion. Weak thermal anomalies during 2-4 June implied cooling lava flows. The Aviation Color Code was lowered to Green.

Dukono  | Halmahera (Indonesia)
Based on analyses of satellite imagery and wind data, the Darwin VAAC reported that on 4 June an ash plume from Dukono rose to an altitude of 2.1 km (7,000 ft) a.s.l. and drifted 150 km N. The next day an ash plume rose to an altitude of 3.7 km (12,000 ft) a.s.l. and drifted 55 km NW. On 9 June ash plumes rose to altitudes of 1.5-1.8 km (5,000-6,000 ft) a.s.l. and drifted 25-30 km NW.

Fuego  | Guatemala
INSIVUMEH reported that on 5 June lahars descended Fuego’s Honda (E), El Jute (SE), Ceniza (SSW), and Santa Teresa (S) drainages, carrying blocks as large as 1.5 m in diameter. Explosions during 5-6 June generated ash plumes that rose 250-350 m and drifted 8-10 km W and NW. Explosions during 8-10 June generated ash plumes that rose 350-750 m and drifted 8-10 km N. Incandescent material ejected 100 m above the crater landed on the flank and formed avalanches. On 9 June lahars in the El Jute and Las Lajas drainages carried blocks up to 1.5 m in diameter

Karymsky  | Eastern Kamchatka (Russia)
KVERT reported that Strombolian and weak Vulcanian activity continued at Karymsky during 30 May-6 June. Satellite images detected no activity or were obscured by clouds. The Aviation Color Code remained at Orange.

Kilauea  | Hawaiian Islands (USA)
During 4-10 June HVO reported that the circulating lava lake occasionally rose and fell in the deep pit within Kilauea’s Halema’uma’u Crater. Gas emissions remained elevated. The plume from the vent continued to deposit variable amounts of ash, spatter, and Pele’s hair onto nearby areas; smaller particles may have been dropped several kilometers away.
At Pu’u ‘O’o Crater, glow emanated from spatter cones on the N, SE, and S portions of the crater floor, and from a small lava lake in the NE spatter cone. On 22 May geologists mapped the farthest point of activity from the Kahauale’a 2 lava flow, 8.4 km NE of Pu’u ‘O’o, and on 6 June they mapped four small breakouts as far as 6.5 km from Pu’u ‘O’o. Smoke plumes rising from forested areas suggested advancing breakout flows.

Merapi  | Central Java (Indonesia)
PVMBG reported that during 30 May-5 June seismicity at Merapi fluctuated at normal levels and declined as compared to the previous two weeks. Deformation measurements showed no significant changes. Solfatara plumes rose 400 m and drifted W on 31 May. The Alert Level remained at 1 (on a scale of 1-4).

Shishaldin  | Fox Islands (USA)
AVO reported that, although cloud cover frequently obscured views of Shishaldin during 4-9 June, seismicity indicated that the low-level eruption continued. Elevated surface temperatures at the summit were detected in mostly cloudy satellite images during 7-9 June. The Aviation Color Code remained at Orange and the Volcano Alert Level remained at Watch.

Shiveluch  | Central Kamchatka (Russia)
KVERT reported that during 30 May-6 June lava-dome extrusion onto Shiveluch’s SE flank was accompanied by ash explosions, incandescence, hot avalanches, and fumarolic activity. Satellite images detected a thermal anomaly over the dome on 31 May and 1 and 3 June. The Aviation Color Code remained at Orange.

Ubinas  | Peru  | 16.355°S, 70.903°W
In a press release from 5 June, IGP’s Observatorio Volcanologico de Arequipa (IGP-OVA) and Observatorio Vulcanológico del INGEMMET (OVI) reported that an Alert Level Orange continued for residents affected by the Ubinas eruption. Residents of Querapi and Tonohaya remained evacuated. The report noted that a significant and continuous release of ash emissions and gasses were observed during the previous days. Gas-and-ash plumes observed during 5-7 June rose 0.2-2 km above the crater. Minor ashfall was reported in Lloque and Yungas during 6-7 June.


 

Explosive eruption of Zhupanovsky volcano (Kamchatka, Russia) (June 7)
Explosive eruption of Zhupanovsky volcano began on June 06, 2014. Ash plume reise up to 20,400 ft (6 km) a.s.l. (data from UHPP and Tokyo VAAC). Satellite data showed the volcano was obscured by clouds.
Moderate explosive eruption of the volcano continues. Ash explosions up to 32,800 ft (10 km) a.s.l. could occur at any time. Ongoing activity could affect international and low-flying aircraft.

Image courtesy AND Copyright kscnet.ru/

Image courtesy AND Copyright kscnet.ru/ – Image dating from October 2013

Screen Shot 2014-06-07 at 16.09.25


Volcano activity for the week of May 28 – June 3, 2014 (June 7)
The Weekly Volcanic Activity Report is a cooperative project between the Smithsonian’s Global Volcanism Program and the US Geological Survey’s Volcano Hazards Program.

New Activity/Unrest
Pavlof  | United States
AVO reported that on 31 May elevated surface temperatures were detected over Pavlof in satellite images, suggesting a low-level eruption with lava. Observers camping near the volcano confirmed lava and noted that flows were originating from a vent on the NE flank. A low-level steam plume was visible in satellite images and recorded by the FAA web-cam located in Cold Bay. Several pilots observed a gas-and-ash plume drifting N at altitudes of 2.1-2.4 km (7,000-8,000 ft) a.s.l. The Aviation Color Code was raised to Orange and the Volcano Alert Level was raised to Watch. Small explosion signals were detected by a distant infrasound sensor. Later that night weak incandescence from the summit was observed in the webcam. On 1 June clouds obscured web-cam views and ash plumes were not detected in satellite images. The seismic network detected weak activity.
Activity escalated on 2 June, prompting AVO to raise the Aviation Color Code to Red and the Volcano Alert Level to Warning. Seismic tremor increased at 1500 and pilots observed ash plumes at altitudes of 6.7 km (22,000 ft) a.s.l. Satellite images showed a plume drifting more than 80 km E. Seismicity started to decrease at 2300. The web cam recorded intense lava fountaining at the summit and incandescence from a spatter-fed lava flow on the N flank. On 3 June seismicity again increased and pilots observed ash-and-steam plumes at altitudes of 7.3 km (24,000 ft) a.s.l. that drifted SSW. Later that day AVO lowered the Aviation Color Code to Orange and the Volcano Alert Level to Watch due to a decrease and stabilization of volcanic tremor. Satellite and webcam images showed two distinct parts of the plume: gas and steam with minor amounts of ash rose high above the volcano and drifted S, while pyroclastic flows on the N flank produced diffuse ash that caused hazy air and variable concentrations of ash below 3 km (10,000 ft) a.s.l. Winds were likely to push ash at lower altitudes WSW.

Image courtesy and Copyright Rachel Kremer

Image courtesy and Copyright Rachel Kremer

San Miguel  | El Salvador
According to SNET in a report from 1 June, the Ministerio de Medio Ambiente y Recursos Naturales (MARN) reported that seismicity at San Miguel remained high. Locals observed more intense gas plumes rising from the crater with occasional minor amounts of ash, especially after rainfall. Rumbling was also reported.

Sangeang Api  | Indonesia
PVMBG reported that during January-29 May diffuse white plumes rose at most 25 m above Sangeang Api’s crater. On 30 May seismicity increased, with tremor starting at 0500 and becoming continuous at 1348. An eruption at 1555 generated an ash plume that rose 3 km and drifted W, causing ashfall over the sea. The Alert Level was raised to 3 (on a scale of 1-4). The island has no permanent settlements, and is only occupied during the growing and harvest seasons; civil authorities evacuated 135 people to the mainland. Based on satellite images, pilot observations, and the Indonesian Meteorological Office, the Darwin VAAC reported that on 30 May an ash plume rose to an altitude of 15.2 km (50,000 ft) a.s.l. and drifted 440 km E and 750 km SE.
BNPB reported that on 31 May two larger explosions occurred at 1330 and 2242. According to the VAAC, ash plumes from those explosions rose to altitudes of 13.7-15.2 km (45,000-50,000 ft) a.s.l. and drifted 280 km NW and other various directions. Later in the day the ash plumes became detached. Ashfall affected many areas in the Bima Regency on the mainland, including Wera, and prompted the evacuation of 7,328 people from four villages within a radius of 8 km from Sangeang Api. The Bima and Tambolaka airports were temporarily closed. According to a news article, all flights to and from the Darwin International Airport in Australia on 31 May were canceled.
The VAAC noted that ash plumes rose to an altitude of 4.3 km (14,000 ft) a.s.l. on 1 June and drifted W and SW. During 2-3 June ash plumes rose to altitudes of 3-4.3 km (10,000-14,000 ft) a.s.l. and drifted 45 km W.

Santa María  | Guatemala
INSIVUMEH reported that on 29 May a hot lahar descended the Nimá I river drainage on the S flank of Santa María’s Santiaguito lava-dome complex, carrying blocks up to 50 cm in diameter as well as tree trunks and branches. The lahar was 25 m wide and 3 m deep and had a strong sulfur odor. Explosions during 31 May-1 June generated ash plumes that rose 600 m and drifted W and SW. Lahars on 1 and 3 June descended and caused flooding in the Nimá I, San Isidro (S), and Samala (E and S) rivers. On 2 June explosions produced ash plumes that rose 500 m, drifted W, and caused ashfall in Monte Bello and Loma Linda. Hot lahars with a sulfur odor again descended Nimá I. On 3 June a lava flow slowly descended the E flank of the dome.

Ongoing Activity
Aira  | Kyushu (Japan)
Based on JMA notices, the Tokyo VAAC reported that on 31 May explosions from Aira Caldera’s Sakurajima volcano generated plumes that rose to an altitude of 3 km (10,000 ft) a.s.l. and drifted W.

Dukono  | Halmahera (Indonesia)
Based on analyses of satellite imagery and wind data, the Darwin VAAC reported that on 28 May ash plumes from Dukono rose to an altitude of 2.1 km (7,000 ft) a.s.l. and drifted 75 km NW. The next day an ash plume rose to an altitude of 3 km (10,000 ft) a.s.l. and drifted 65 km W. On 3 June ash plumes rose to an altitude of 2.1 km (7,000 ft) a.s.l. and drifted 55 km NW.

Fuego  | Guatemala
INSIVUMEH reported that during 31 May-1 June explosions at Fuego produced ash plumes that rose 350-550 m above the crater and drifted 8 km WNW. During the afternoon and evening of 1 June lahars descended the Las Lajas (SE) and Honda (E) drainages, as well as the Seca (W) drainage which disrupted traffic. Other sections of roadway to the W and S were also affected. Heavy rain continued on 2 June; lahars descended the Las Lajas and El Jute (SE) drainages, carrying blocks as large as 1.5 m in diameter. Explosions during 2-3 June generated ash plumes that rose 550-650 m and drifted 8 km S and SW. Incandescence rose above the crater and avalanches descended the Taniluyá (SW), Trinidad (S), and Ceniza (SSW) drainages.

Karymsky  | Eastern Kamchatka (Russia)
KVERT reported that Strombolian and weak Vulcanian activity continued at Karymsky during 23-30 May. Satellite images detected a thermal anomaly over the volcano on 25 and 27 May. The Aviation Color Code remained at Orange.

Kilauea  | Hawaiian Islands (USA)
During 28 May-3 June HVO reported that the circulating lava lake occasionally rose and fell in the deep pit within Kilauea’s Halema’uma’u Crater. Gas emissions remained elevated. The plume from the vent continued to deposit variable amounts of ash, spatter, and Pele’s hair onto nearby areas; smaller particles may have been dropped several kilometers away.
At Pu’u ‘O’o Crater, glow emanated from spatter cones on the N, NE, SE, and S portions of the crater floor. During 30 May-1 June the small lava lake in the NE spatter cone briefly overflowed its rim each morning. On 22 May geologists mapped the farthest point of activity from the Kahauale’a 2 lava flow, 8.4 km NE of Pu’u ‘O’o; on 30 May they mapped three small breakouts 1.8-6.2 km from Pu’u ‘O’o.

Merapi  | Central Java (Indonesia)
PVMBG reported that during 16-22 May seismicity at Merapi fluctuated at normal levels and deformation measurements showed no significant changes. Solfatara plumes rose 300 m and drifted W on 27 May. The Alert Level remained at 1 (on a scale of 1-4) on 23 May.

Shishaldin  | Fox Islands (USA)
AVO reported that, although cloud cover frequently obscured views of Shishaldin during 28 May-3 June, elevated surface temperatures at the summit were detected in satellite images, and minor steam emissions were observed in webcam images. The Aviation Color Code remained at Orange and the Volcano Alert Level remained at Watch.

Shiveluch  | Central Kamchatka (Russia)
KVERT reported that during 23-30 May lava-dome extrusion onto Shiveluch’s SE flank was accompanied by ash explosions, incandescence, hot avalanches, and fumarolic activity. An explosion on 26 May generated an ash plume that rose as high as 10 km (32,800 ft) a.s.l. and drifted 800 km SSE. Satellite images detected a thermal anomaly over the dome during 23-25 and 27-28 May. The Aviation Color Code remained at Orange.

Ubinas  | Peru
Observatorio Vulcanológico del INGEMMET (OVI) reported that during 28-29 May ash emissions at Ubinas continued; gas-and-ash plumes rose 0.6-2.5 km above the crater and drifted ESE. Ashfall was reported in various towns downwind of the plumes, including Querapi (4 km S), Ubinas (6.5 km SSE), Escacha, Chojata, San Miguel, and Tonohaya. The Buenos Aires VAAC reported that seismicity fluctuated during 2-3 June. Satellite and webcam images as well as pilot observations indicated continuous emission of gas and ash that rose to altitudes of 6.7-10.7 km (22,000-35,000 ft) a.s.l. and drifted NE, E, and SE.


 

Powerful eruption of the Sangeang Api volcano, Indonesia (May 31)
The eruption was so powerfull that ash from the eruption has reached western Queensland, Australia 3000 km southeast today (1 day later)
- VIRGIN flights between Perth and Bali this evening have been cancelled due to spewing ash from an Indonesian volcano. Other flights in the region have also been disrupted by the eruption.
- Mount Sangeang Api in Bima District, West Nusa Tenggara, erupted on Friday at 03:55 p. m. local time spewing plumes of ash and smoke 3,000 meters westbound into the air. Chief of Information and Data Center of the National Disaster Mitigation Agency (BNPB) Sutopo Purwo Nugroho said in message broadcast here on Friday that due to the eruption the Geology Disaster Mitigation and Volcanology Center (PVMBG) had raised the Mount Sangeang Apis status from alert level II (Waspada) to alert III (Siaga) at 04:00 p. m. local time. The volcano is located at Sangeang Api island, which has no permanent residents, Nugroho said Read the full Antara News article here


Chaparrastique and Momotombo activity‏ (May 26)
Seismicity remains high at Chaparrastique (San Miguel) volcano (El Salvador).  In the last day, local inhabitants have reported rumbling noises coming from the volcano.
Another burst of volcano-tectonic seismicity occurred yesterday beneathy the southern flank of Momotombo volcano (Nicaragua) (station MOMN).  There has been a general diminuition of aftershock activity from April’s twin magnitude M6 earthquakes which struck near the volcano (which is normal behavior for fault-induced seismicity).  Given the rapid-fire nature of this (and others) sequence, its somewhat unusual depth (15 km; though this may be preliminary) and their location close to the volcano, they may represent “readjustments” of the Momotombo magmatic system to stress changes brought about by the April earthquakes.


 

Earthquake fault line in central Turkey up for sale (May 26)
Public land encompassing a fault line in the Central Anatolian province of Eskişehir has been put up for sale by Turkey’s Privatization High Council (ÖYK), drawing reactions from an influential NGO.
The ÖYK announced in the Official Gazette on May 8 that public land in Eskişehir’s Odunpazarı district, which is listed as a zone containing “residences, a green space, a road, university land and a fault line,” is available for purchase.
Read the full article here

Image courtesy and copyright hurriyetdailynews.com

Image courtesy and copyright hurriyetdailynews.com


 

Mudflow at Chaparrastique‏ (May 24)
The signal I mentioned yesterday apparently resulted from a mudflow down the volcano’s flank. Meteorological instruments recorded 75 mm of rainfall during the period.  Internal activity at Chaparrastique (San Miguel) remains very high.

Chaparrastique_RSAM_20140523


 

Eruptive activity at Chaparrastique  (El Salvador) ?‏
Spectrographic and seismographic data indicate eruptive activity occurred at Chaparrastique (San MIguel) volcano (El Salvador) late yesterday.  SNET has reported frequent “ash puffs” coming from the volcano during the past week of heightened seismic activity there.  The most recent seismic data (station VSM) indicate a more energetic outburst.  Thus far, there have been no press releases confirming the event which occurred early yesterday evening.


 

Yushu earthquake (Tibet, China) rebuilding (temporary?) halted (May 23)
After an earthquake in Yushu, the capital of Qinghai, China, that left more than 100,000 homeless in Tibet, Chinese efforts to rebuild have been incomplete following the New York Times.


 

Felt seismicity again at Volcan Chiles – Cerro Negro de Mayasquer‏ (May 21)
More “nose-thumbing” from these volcanoes this afternoon!

Chaparrastique and Volcan Chiles – Cerro Negro de Mayasquer – Cumbal‏ (May 21)
Rodger Wilson reports : Seismicity, while at still a very high level, has dropped at Chaparrastique (San Miguel) volcano (El Salvador) (station VSM) with no untoward effect (…so far!).  I’ve watched this volcano (via the internet) for more than ten years and frankly, this is “typical” behavior for San Miguel (though as mentioned, RSAM is now at quite a high level!).  Seismicity/tremor will build over days to a “crescendo” and then slowly diminish over time without eruption (until this past December!).  Which is why, I believe, the December eruption caught everyone off-guard.  If you observe the histogram of activity this past year, or even back to 2006, you will see the many RSAM peaks where no eruption resulted.  Authorities are alittle “jumpy” about the current activity (as they should be!) because of the December eruption and similar high RSAM values, but I’m beginning to think this current behavior will settle-back without a significant outburst.

Seismicity, while also high at Volcan ChilesCerro Negro de Mayasquer (Ecuador-Colombia Border) (station VIEN), has also decreased, from 8800 events the week ending on 13 May to 6600 events this past week.  Interestingly, seismicity levels doubled during the same period at next door volcano (and also restive!) Cumbal!  Such volcanic interaction between neighboring vents is fairly common and has been instrumentally (Seismic, GPS, interferometry) observed at South American, Icelandic and other volcanoes, including between our neighboring volcanoes Mount Saint Helens, Mount Rainier and Hood!  Some scientists believe that magmatic inflation may occur in sort of a “competition” where pressurization of one system may temporarily “pinch-off” the magma supply to the neighboring system.  In other cases, it may place added pressure on the neighboring system causing it to become more restive and possibly erupt!  Another scenario involves the rapid depressurization brought about by an eruption which in turn releases pressure on the neighboring magmatic system which might cause vesiculation in that chamber, leading to unrest and possibly eruption.  I believe the latter is what occurred between Mount Saint Helens and Mount Rainier during the early stages of the 2004 eruption at MSH.
At any rate,…Colombian and Ecuadoran volcanologists continue to closely monitor and evaluate the ongoing activity at all three volcanoes.  To my knowlege, there has been no “offical” meeting as of yet to discuss possible emergency plans should there be an eruption, though this was discussed last week.  As if to mock us humans, seismicity appears again high at the volcanoes today (station VIEN).

 


OLDER ARCHIVED PARTS OF THIS REPORT :
2013 : July 8 – July 31
2013 : June 24 – July 7
2013 : June 8 – June 23
2013 : May 26 – June 7
2013 : June 8 – August 20
2013 : August 21 – October 27
2013 : October 28 – December 12
2013 : December 13 – January 30
2014 : February 1 – May 20

Comments

  1. Gordon Hervey says:

    October 18 2013 UTC
    I always enjoy these reports and wanted to ask a question that I have also posted on Volcano Monitor. Japan Today has an Oct 18 article “Izu Oshima mayor under fire for not issuing evacuation orders.” A Tokyo Uni expert is quoted “the top layer of volcanic ash from recent explosions had been washed off by the massive rainfall….knocking down trees and…houses”. Dozens still missing or dead. My point is that the local volcano Mount Mihara must have had frequent explosions, yet I have not seen the name before now on any listings, anywhere. Modis data problems, Japan keeping secrets, what could this sort of thing imply?

    • Richard Rodger Wilson says:

      Hi Gordon,

      You have to remember, when a volcanologist (geologist) says “recent” he may be referring to an event that has occurred during the last 10,000 years! Mount Mihara has in fact erupted more recently (in a big way in 1986!) to produce exposed ash layers on the island. Regardless of their age, fragmental volcanic deposits are always susceptible to remobilization from heavy rains. If you live any time on a volcano you will understand this, so I don’t understand the accusatory aspect of the headline.

      Thanks for reading our report!

      Rodger

    • Gordon Hervey says:

      Thanks very much for your reply, I’m browsing a bit to try and find how ‘recent’ the Mt Mihara explosions have been. Apparently the mayor was out of town during the typhoon and took a decision NOT to evacuate Izu. As it turned out, that cost a lot of lives. It would seem to me that the description of ash buildup as ‘recent’ probably means ‘since the previous typhoon’, as otherwise the disaster might have occured then?

  2. Craig Heden says:

    Multiple seismo stations around Mt. Shasta are showing what appears to be episodic “pulses” of activity.
    The amplitude of some events are significantly higher than what I usually see.
    I am in visual contact with Mt. Shasta from my home, and no weather-related phenomena appears present.
    I wonder if this is the beginning/associated of deep-tremor event, or whether there is magmatic movement involved? Or, maybe purely tectonic?
    Maybe Roger can comment if this activity is indeed unusual?

    • Armand Vervaeck says:

      I will surely ask Rodger, Craig – Thanks for commenting

    • Richard Rodger Wilson says:

      Hi Craig,

      I’m pretty sure the pulses (the longer, cigar-shaped signals?) you refer to are actually produced by trains (provided you are looking at the northwest flank and Military Pass seismometers). How do I know this you ask?,…I used to maintain the College of the Siskiyous seismographs way back in the early 1980′s for Mr. Paul Dawson who was the C.O.S. Geology Instructor at that time.

      Thanks for your readership Craig!

      Rodger

    • Craig Heden says:

      Rodger and Armand,
      Thanks for your attention to my question. The two stations I was noting unusual seismo-signals were LMP and LGB. Both stations appear quite a ways away from the railroad. Also, as of now, (10-17-13, 12:36 PDT), both stations indicate different types of activity occurred early in the plot as compared to later on. The time duration for each period of elevated signals is also is quite long. I know how long the freight trains can be up there ( I fish the Cantera loop area often), but the duration of the activity appears too long for even the largest trains? Thanks again if you have any further info or theories to share.

  3. Matthew says:

    Some red on the White Island seismic drum today!
    http://www.geonet.org.nz/p/volcano/drums/latest/wiz-seismic-drum.png
    pretty hard to tell whether there was actually an eruption or not, typical NZ weather!

  4. Paul Wyse says:

    I’m curious about the fact that the main seismograph for Cerro Negro in Nicaragua picks up so many more of the volcanic earthquakes at Momotomobo than any of the other INETER seismographs. Has anyone speculated on a remote plumbing connection between Cerro Negro and Momotombo even though they seem to be a litte too far apart? Telica is certainly much closer to Cerro Negro than Momotombo is and yet it seems that there’s only tectonic earthquakes that seem to show up on both the Cerro Negro and Telica graphs.

    • Richard Rodger Wilson says:

      Hi Paul,

      Sorry it’s taken so long for me to respond to your questions! I’m not that familiar with seismic equipment that INETER has on each of the volcanoes, but the discrepencies you noted in seismic data from adjacent volcanoes usually results from: a) different settings in the gain or amplification of individual stations, and b) the type of seismometers placed on individual volcanoes. For instance, many observatories have switched-over to using broad-band instrumentation at volcanoes during the past decade to detect (just as the name implies) the broader range of seismic wave frequencies generated by volcanoes. The “old school” (i.e. less sensitive) single-component vertical seismometers (but continue to be used) are most sensitive to the relatively high frequencies (> 5Hz) generated by nearby events and have difficulty in detecting special types (low-frequency) of volcanic earthquakes as well as more distant events.

      Hope this helps!
      Rodger

  5. rachael says:

    hello i live twety miles of mount shasta its looms in our view in most siskiyou couny. I dont feel it will blow up no earth quakes here the large earth quake a while ago originating frm lassen was not even noticable my thaughts are that lassen will be going sooner tan later that is not far from here
    George Wilson.. if you ever need photos or information from someone who lives next to mount shasta let me know… your site is so great thanks yu

    • Armand Vervaeck says:

      Thanks George! There was just a small earthquake at Mount Shasta overnight! I used to live in Weed for three years in the early 1980′s. There was alot more activity around Shasta at that time. You are right, it is very quiet for a volcano!

  6. Hi My name is Alex Schmollinger and I’m from Dallas TX and i just want too know is MT. Shasta getting ready too go off and blow it’s top in the 2013 year too come and i was in the Shasta area and i didn’t see any smoke or feel any recent quakes around the big Shasta Volcano so i need someone out there too tell me is Mt Shasta going too go off in 2013 year span or no?

    • Richard Rodger Wilson says:

      Hi Alex,

      Actually, Mount Shasta is one of the “quieter” Cascade volcanoes. There were seismic episodes during the late 1970′s, early 1980′s and again in the early 1990′s that made volcanologists sort of sit up and take notice of Mount Shasta, but since those periods,…the volcano has been relatively silent.

  7. v says:

    “This is likely the result of the infamous “familiarity breeds contempt” syndrome where the local population becomes complacent near a growing lava dome.” The real problem is that the scientists are blind and they suffer from the same syndrome.

    • Richard Rodger Wilson says:

      Hi v,

      Not so much the scientists being blind in this case. We are all to some extent free to (…and guilty of) ignore clear warning signs in all sorts of circumstances.

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