Bardarbunga volcano (Iceland) update(s) September 2 – lava fountains up to 200 meter high!

Last update: September 2, 2014 at 6:34 pm by By

After Rodger Wilson was obliged to discontinue his daily participation at this site, we have decided to start up an El Hierro type article. The newest additions will always be on top and if the article gets too long, we will cut off a part of it and archive it. This url will always be the one to follow and if you leave our page open in your browser, the page will refresh every 15 minutes automatically.
Please be a little patient with this new format.
This report is compiled out of many information sources.

For our El Hierro volcano report : Click here


-

Bárðarbunga update September 2 18:22 UTC
Try to find the helicopter in this picture

Bárðarbunga update September 2 17:22 UTC
Euronews has the best video footage so far. Long enough to enjoy the power of lava fountains and to observe every detail.

Bárðarbunga update September 2 16:31 UTC
Fountains of lava up to 200 meter high !!! Be careful for your ears/speakers as the wind is very noisy!

Bárðarbunga update September 2 16:00 UTC
From the Scientific Advisory Board
Scientists from the Icelandic Met Office and the Institute of Earth Sciences and representatives of the Civil Protection in Iceland attend the meetings of the Scientific Advisory Board of the Icelandic Civil Protection
Conclusions of the Scientific Advisory Board of the Icelandic Civil Protection:
- A noticeable decrease in seismicity has occurred during the last 24 hours. The level of activity is approximately half of that during recent days.
- Since midnight today, around 300 earthquakes have occurred. At the same time yesterday, 01 September, around 500 earthquakes had been detected.
- The rate of deformation at GPS sites closest to the dyke intrusion has decreased. Together with an overnight decrease in seismicity, this implies that magma inflow appears to match magma outflow at the eruption site.
- The eruption has not created any ash-fall.
- A white plume of steam and gas rises from the eruption on Holuhraun, reaching an elevation of about 4.5 km above sea level. Downwind, a volcanic cloud extends from the eruption site.
- Yesterday afternoon a white cloud from the eruption extended 60 km to the north-north-east.
- In comparison to yesterday, more sulfur dioxide has been measured in the eruption cloud.
- Sandstorms on the floodplain around the eruption site have contributed fine-grained particles to the eruption cloud. This was seen as a light-brown haze earlier today near to Egilsstaðir.
- The eruptive fissure is about 1.5 km in length, positioned about 4.5 km from the ice margin of Dyngjujökull.
- At 14:00 UTC yesterday, the lava flow was 4.2 km2 in area. At 08:00 UTC the edge had extended 1.5 km to the east-south-east.
- The eruption continues, although there appears to have been a slight decrease in activity compared to yesterday.
* It remains unclear how the situation will develop. Four scenarios are still considered most likely:
**** The migration of magma could stop, resulting in a gradual reduction in seismic activity and no further eruptions.
**** The dike could reach the Earth’s surface causing another eruption, possibly on a new fissure. Lava flow and (or) explosive activity cannot be excluded.
**** The intrusion reaches the surface and another eruption occurs where either the fissure is partly or entirely beneath Dyngjujökull. This would most likely produce a flood in Jökulsá á Fjöllum and perhaps explosive, ash-producing activity.
**** An eruption in Bárðarbunga. The eruption could cause an outburst flood and possibly an explosive, ash-producing activity. In the event of a subglacial eruption, it is most likely that flooding would affect Jökulsá á Fjöllum. However it is not possible to exclude the following flood paths: Skjálfandafljót, Kaldakvísl, Skaftá and Grímsvötn.
******* Other scenarios cannot be excluded.

Bárðarbunga update September 2 07:34 UTC
- The eruption is still “alive and kicking”
- from geoscientist on duty :
* Volcanic activity in Holuhraun continues at steady rate.
* According to webcam observation there is no visible change in activity since yesterday with effusive lava eruption and fountains.
* Seismic activity has been rather quiet this night. *
* Biggest earthquake measured was early in the night, 3.1 in magnitude.
* Automatically detected events are around 110 at 6:50AM.
* Most of the events, including the biggest one, were located in the northern part of the magma intrusion with some activity extending under the glacier rim.

Screen Shot 2014-09-02 at 09.31.44 Screen Shot 2014-09-02 at 09.36.14


 

Bárðarbunga update September 1 23:37 UTC
1st September 2014 19:00 – from geoscientist on duty
- Since midnight over 700 earthquakes have been detected automatically which is somewhat fewer than in the past few days.
- The main activity is in the dyke.
- Two earthquakes occurred by the northern rim of the Bardarbunga caldera, at 08:58 AM M5.0 and 11:41 AM M5.3.
- Over 140 earthquakes were detected by Herðubreiðartögl, NE of Askja volcano. A few earthquakes were detected near Askja.

Bárðarbunga update September 1 23:30 UTC
1st September 2014 17:47 – notes from surveillance flight
TF-SIF, the Icelandic Coast Guard’s aircraft, did a surveillance flight this afternoon, 13:45 – 16:30. Scientists from the Icelandic Met Office and the Institute of Earth Sciences and a representative of the Civil Protection in Iceland were aboard. Conditions were somewhat cloudy, but visibility was fair in low flight and radar images were retreived at higher altitudes.
Main conclusions:
- The fissure is 1,5 km long. Continuous eruption takes place on a 600-800 m long central section. A single crater has been active at its southern end, but little or no lava extrudes from it now. Lava plumes rise to a height of a few tens of meters where the activity is greatest, centrally on the fissure.
- The lava stretches 3,5 km ANA from the center of the fissure. It is max 1,6 km wide but narrower further from the craters.
- The edge of the lava is a tongue 500 m wide. A continuous lava stream flows along the center of the lava field, almost to the edge. The edges are glowing. Apparently, non of the tributaries of river Jökulsá á Fjöllum touches the lava edge.
- The area of the lava is now 4 km2. At 16:00, a rough estimate gives 20-30 million cubic meters of lava. Which means that 5-10 million cubic meters have been added in 18-19 hours. Therefore, average flow is of the order of degree 100 m3/s.
- Two small cauldrons in Dyngjujökull, aligned in the direction of the fissure, seemed unchanged since Friday 29 August.
- Radar revealed no changes in Bárðarbunga nor in the depressions to the southeast of it.
Plume:
- A white plume, with a blue tint below, rose from the eruptive site, and drifted ENE. Maximum height is 15000 feet (4,5 km a.s.l.), ca 10 km from the eruptive site. The plume forms a cloud with very sharp edges at the top and below. The lower edge is in 6500 feet (2.0 km a.s.l.). This cloud reaches at least 60 km NNE. The southern edge of it is over Báruvatn, Laugarvalladalur and the southernmost part of lake Lögurinn. The cloud is about 10 km wide, 30 km northeast of the eruptive site. A dustcloud, originating from the Flæður, lies below the plume and its cloud. It didn‘t seem that any ash came from the cloud. The white colour of the plume does not suggest any ash.

Screen Shot 2014-09-02 at 01.35.01

Bárðarbunga update September 1 23:14 UTC
We have archived August 29 and August 30 as this article became too lon again. Links at the bottom of this page.

Bárðarbunga update September 1 16:43 UTC
Some great images from the staff of the University of Iceland, Earth Science Institute

Screen Shot 2014-09-01 at 23.36.08

Screen Shot 2014-09-01 at 23.39.42

Map of the new lava field in Holuhraun. Abt 20-30 million m^3 of lava this afternoon. Average effusion rate ~100 m3/s

Bárðarbunga update September 1 16:43 UTC
- A similar fissure eruption at Krafla in 1984 lasted a fortnight, whereas a 1980 eruption lasted seven months!
- Below with the installed scientific seismometers from the Futurevolc project

Screen Shot 2014-09-01 at 18.37.21

Bárðarbunga update September 1 14:34 UTC
University of Iceland (part of the science team) reports :
- Current effusion rate ~1/4 of yesterdays. Activity mostly in one crater in northern part of fissure, south part has stopped
- Lot’s of sulphur gas released in the eruption, ~20 000 tonnes/day (rough estimate). Scientists encouraged to wear gas masks

Bárðarbunga update September 1 14:22 UTC
1st September 2014 12:23 – from the Scientific Advisory Board
Scientists from the Icelandic Met Office and the Institute of Earth Sciences and representatives of the Civil Protection in Iceland attend the meetings of the Scientific Advisory Board of the Icelandic Civil Protection.
Conclusions of the Scientific Advisory Board of the Icelandic Civil Protection:
* The lava eruption on Holuhraun continues. Lava flows northward from the eruption site.
* At 13:00 UTC today, an overflight will be made over Holuhraun and north-west Vatnajökull with scientists from the Icelandic Meteorological Office and the University of Iceland, together with a representative from the Icelandic Civil Protection. Observations from this flight will be reported in later briefings.
* At 20:00 UTC yesterday, the lava extended over a 3-km-area. This corresponds to a magma discharge of 300 to 500 cubic metres per second. From observations yesterday evening, the volume of erupted lava is between 16 and 25 million cubic metres.
* The eruption has not created any ash-fall.
* Gas and steam rises to a couple of hundred metres above the eruption site, extending up to 1,200 m downwind.
* In connection with the FUTUREVOLC project, a gas monitoring station has been set-up near to the eruption site. Gas measurements indicate a high level of sulphur dioxide. People could be exposed to highly dangerous gas levels close to the eruption. It is essential that those visiting the eruption site are equipped with gas sensors and gas masks.
* According to the latest GPS observations, horizontal ground movements continue in response to the dyke intrusion. There is no clear sign of a pressure decrease in the dyke intrusion in connection with the ongoing eruption, although there are irregularities in GPS displacements at nearby stations. The northern extent of the dyke intrusion has not changed to any great extent.
* When Sunday’s eruption began earthquake activity decreased somewhat, although seismicity remains high, with over 500 earthquakes detected since midnight today. Most of the seismicity is occurring on the northern end of the dyke intrusion, covering a 15-km-long region that extends partly beneath Dyngjujökull and north of the ice margin.
* At 08:58 UTC today, a magnitude 5.0 earthquake was recorded on the Bárðarbunga caldera, and another of magnitude 5.2 at 11:41 UTC in the same region.
* It remains unclear how the situation will develop. Four scenarios are still considered most likely:
*** The migration of magma could stop, resulting in a gradual reduction in seismic activity and no further eruptions.
*** The dike could reach the Earth’s surface causing another eruption, possibly on a new fissure. Lava flow and (or) explosive activity cannot be excluded.
*** The intrusion reaches the surface and another eruption occurs where either the fissure is partly or entirely beneath Dyngjujökull. This would most likely produce a flood in Jökulsá á Fjöllum and perhaps explosive, ash-producing activity.
*** An eruption in Bárðarbunga. The eruption could cause an outburst flood and possibly an explosive, ash-producing activity. In the event of a subglacial eruption, it is most likely that flooding would affect Jökulsá á Fjöllum. However it is not possible to exclude the following flood paths: Skjálfandafljót, Kaldakvísl, Skaftá and Grímsvötn.
***** Other scenarios cannot be excluded.

Tavurvur  Papua New Guinea September 1 14:17 UTC
Ash in Rabaul, Papua New Guinea (New Britain) after the massive eruption of Tavurvur volcano

Bárðarbunga update September 1 13:39 UTC
I guess that there are a lot of people who are thinking that what they are watching on the webcam is a fairly small and not so powerful eruption. The contrary is the case.  Gudmundur Karl Gudmundsson made this close-by video with sound from the first eruption. Huge volumes of fresh magma are building another piece of Iceland. Click on the image to be linked to the Facebook page with the video.

Screen Shot 2014-09-01 at 15.36.51

Bárðarbunga update September 1 12:58 UTC
* Considerable amounts of SO2 gas being observed near Holuhraun #eruption and in gas clouds from there – danger for those up close
* Scientists near the Holuhraun eruption site have been told by IMO to wear gas masks and carry gas meters

Tavurvur  Papua New Guinea September 1 12:54 UTC
We found a great article from Robin Wylie, a PhD researcher in Volcanology at University College London. You will understand that we do not like his tittle but nevertheless we give it in full this time :
Move over Iceland, Tavurvur in Papua New Guinea is the volcano to watch
Last week, the eyes of volcanologists – and presumably a few nervous pilots – were fixed on Iceland. But unexpectedly, the volcanic eruption that made headlines happened on the other side of the world, in Papua New Guinea.
Before dawn on August 29, Tavurvur – a stratovolcano on the island of New Britain, in Papua New Guinea’s eastern archipelago – awoke spectacularly after two decades of dormancy. The eruption shot lava hundreds of metres into the air, while the accompanying ash cloud reached 18km, almost double the cruising altitude of most commercial aircraft. As a precaution, several flights from Australia were rerouted around the volcano.
Read the full article here

Screen Shot 2014-09-01 at 14.52.52

Bárðarbunga update September 1 12:34 UTC
Only Universities can write a tweet like this :
“Univ. of Iceland @uni_iceland : How awesome! Lava from #Holuhraun! Yesterday, this piece of pahoehoe was molten!

Screen Shot 2014-09-01 at 14.32.57

Bárðarbunga update September 1 12:28 UTC
A Timelapse of the webcam during the night which we love a lot. You you watch very well you can see a new layer of magma spreading on top of another one still hot and red.

Bárðarbunga update September 1 12:03 UTC
- What happens next may depend on whether new magma is entering the system, and from where and how much and at what rate.
- Reports yesterday about #ash being detected in Akureyri and other places turned out to be incorrect. Simply material blown by strong winds.
Still a lot of strong seismicity since midnight. Below an overview of it. 1 M5.2 is still missing. Also that one was below the Bardarbunga rim

Screen Shot 2014-09-01 at 14.02.14

Screen Shot 2014-09-01 at 14.06.36

Bárðarbunga update September 1 08:57 UTC
The image below is a map drawn on the basis of the hourly flyover of the NOAA and NASA heat detection satellites. The different colors are showing the start of the eruption

Screen Shot 2014-09-01 at 10.36.12

Bárðarbunga update September 1 07:57 UTC
01st September 2014 06:45 – from geoscientist on duty
The activity around Bárðarbunga from midnight 1. September until 06:50:
Volcanic activity in Holuhraun:
The fissure eruption is continuing at a stable level. No explosive activity is observed, the eruption remains an effusive lava eruption. Visual observation by webcam and low level volcanic tremor on seismometers do not show any obvious changes since evening. More detailled information will soon follow from scientists in the field.
Seismic activity:
Around 250 earthquakes have been automatically detected until now. Most of them are located in the northern part of the magma intrusion, between the eruption site and south to about 10 km into Dynjujökull. Strongest events were up to around magnitude 2. The rate of events has decreased as a result of pressure release due to the eruption, but there is still ongoing continuous seismicity.
Several events have occurred around the Bárðarbunga caldera rim, strongest events were M4.2 at 03:09 on the southern rim and M4.5 at 04:59 on the northern rim.
In the broader Askja region, most events were located at Herðubreiðartögl, the strongest event there was M2.9 at 02:56. This area is a quite common place for seismic activity, the activity now is not necessarily caused by increased stress due to the intrusion (the tip of the intrusion is about 25 km SW of this cluster). Askja volcano itself was seismically quiet.

Bárðarbunga update September 1 06:57 UTC
No new scientist bulletin this morning.
The eruption continues at full flow. Bardarbunga2 webcam now zoomed out.
Wind direction is opposite from yesterday but as the lava contains almost no ash, this is not important for the population, even better like it is now.

Screen Shot 2014-09-01 at 09.11.29

Bárðarbunga update August 31 23:02 UTC
Amazing photo of Holuhraun #eruption taken this evening by @uni_iceland staff @gislio

Screen Shot 2014-09-01 at 01.00.43

Bárðarbunga update August 31 21:48 UTC
* The highest lava fountains are about 70m high. The temperature of the lava is about 1200°C (~2200°F).
* Until scientists downgrade danger of eruption starting under glacier then area north of Bardarbunga will be closed to cars and hikers
* Scientists warn that this cycle of eruptions can last until next year or longer. Great excuse to visit Iceland
* Scientists have revised amount of magma coming up to 250 m3/s – the lava is flowing NE at a rate of 1/2-1 m/minute

Bárðarbunga update August 31 21:01 UTC
WOW, what a show now at the webcam now.  http://www.livefromiceland.is/webcams/bardarbunga-2/

Screen Shot 2014-08-31 at 23.00.00

Bárðarbunga update August 31 20:41 UTC
And finally a great video recorded by Rob Green, one of the people who have the great task to do field work (yes, we are jealous :)

Bárðarbunga update August 31 20:34 UTC
31st August 2014 18:21
Few additional facts since status report earlier today:
* Now about 700 earthquakes have been detected since midnight.
* An earthquake M4.9 occurred at 16:12 on the northern rim of the Bárðarbunga caldera.
* The main seismic activity has been in the intrusive dike. Only a few quakes have been located near the caldera rim, mostly its northern part.
* Little seismic activity has been near Askja but some seismic activity near Herðubreiðartögl.
* Weather conditions; very windy (Yes, we know that – we are almost seasick :)

Bárðarbunga update August 31 20:30 UTC
Sequence at 10:15 UTC on Sunday August 31 2014 – The length of the fissure was approx. 1.5 km and the lava flow was calculated at 1000 cubic meter per second. Lava fountains and flowing Pahoehoe lava is clearly visible on this video and is reaching a maximum height of 60 meter – Video courtesy Mila, livefromIceland.is webcam

Bárðarbunga update August 31 17:10 UTC
Acceptable “still” Mila webcam picture from the fissure eruption made a couple of minutes ago.
Watching the LIVE webcam will make you more seasick than a cruise journey on the oceans :)

Screen Shot 2014-08-31 at 19.08.07

Bárðarbunga update August 31 17:07 UTC
In our category “nice to know” (Askja is a volcano to the North-West of Bardarbunga – see map below)

Bárðarbunga update August 31 16:47 UTC
31st August 2014 14:45 – from meteorologist on duty
Visibility to the eruption site is now good. No ash has has been detected. The Aviation Color Code for Bárðarbunga has therefore been reset to ‘orange’ and the code for Askja is still at ‘yellow’.

Bárðarbunga update August 31 16:00 UTC
31st August 2014 12:07 – from the Scientific Advisory Board
Scientists from the Icelandic Met Office and the Institute of Earth Sciences and representatives of the Civil Protection in Iceland attend the meetings of the Scientific Advisory Board of the Icelandic Civil Protection.
Conclusions of the Scientific Advisory Board of the Icelandic Civil Protection:
* A lava eruption started in Holuhraun shortly after 04 AM, on the same volcanic fissure, which erupted earlier this week. The fissure is estimated to be 1,5 km long. It was detected on Míla´s web-camera at 05:51 AM.
* Fewer earthquakes seem to follow the event than in the previous eruption, but more lava is being extruded.
* At 07 AM the lava flow was around 1 km wide and 3 km long towards northeast.
* The thickness was estimated a few meters, the flow about 1000 m3 pr second.
* Approximately 500 earthquakes were detected in the area and smaller than before. The strongest earthquake, M3.8 was in the Bárðarbunga caldera. Poor weather conditions prevail in the area, which makes detection of smaller earthquakes difficult.
* GPS measurements show continued movements north of Dyngjujökull.
* Gas emissions rise to a few hundred meters above the fissure.
* Weather conditions make it difficult to follow the progression of the eruption, but scientists are in the area, using every opportunity to acquire information on gas and lava outflow.
* Weather conditions do not allow overflight at this time. The opportunity to fly over the area will be assessed later today.
From the Icelandic Met Office:
* The Aviation Colour Code for Bárðarbunga is at ‘red’ and the code for Askja at ‘yellow’.

Map courtesy and copyright @RUVfrettir

Map courtesy and copyright @RUVfrettir

Bárðarbunga update August 31 13:12 UTC
A lot of people are still struggling with the location of the Holuhraum eruption site versus the Bardarbunga, Kverkfjoll and Askja volcanoes. The map below shows them all 4

Click on the image to go to the website of this great very detailed map

Click on the image to go to the website of this great very detailed map

Bárðarbunga update August 31 13:12 UTC

Bárðarbunga update August 31 13:07 UTC
- The eruption started around 0400. Lava is flowing at around 1000 m3/s and is 1kmx3km wide. Still ongoing
- The stronger earthquakes are still happening outside the erupting fissure area, at the Bardarbunga caldera. A little earlier the strongest one today, with a preliminary value of 4.8. (Update : IMO reports a M5.1 at a depth of 5.2 km – IMO has a lot of instruments in the area and will have always the best results in Iceland (this message for those among you who think that USGS is always the most accurate :) ))
- Below an image from the University of Iceland of the fresh Pahoehoe lava

Screen Shot 2014-08-31 at 14.56.39

Bárðarbunga update August 31 12:34 UTC
Okay, we agree that the video below which we captured from the Mila Bardarbunga 2 webcam in a rare moment of relative clarity is not what we want, but at least you can clearly see the lava fountains dancing in the wind. They are spouting up to 60 meters high (the webcam has a big zoom)

Bárðarbunga update August 31 11:03 UTC
The image below shows the risks scientists are taking in coming as near as possible to the eruption site. In a fissure eruption nobody knows where exactly the fissure will surface. It is a calculated risk of course but a calculation with a number of unknown parameters.  Must be a literally thrilling sensation.
A scientific report will arrive soon (scientific committee meeting now)

Screen Shot 2014-08-31 at 12.56.20

Bárðarbunga update August 31 10:27 UTC
@almannavarnir : Fissure est. 1.5 km with lava flowing 3 km east, lava fountains. Now a storm is going over the area and very low visibility.

Bárðarbunga update August 31 10:25 UTC
I am again obliged to cut a part of this article as Bardarbunga and Tavurvur made it too long, but extremely interesting at the same time.
August 27 and 28 have now been archived – see link below to consult it

Bárðarbunga update August 31 09:52 UTC
Pahoehoe lava (Yes, the Hawaiian type and name) flow this morning, in Iceland also called “helluhraun”. Pictures by Ármann Höskuldsson via @uni_iceland
For those who not know the lava types – 2 main categories a) Pahoehoe lava (smooth, unbroken) and b) AA lava (very brittle)

Screen Shot 2014-08-31 at 12.03.03

AA lava

Screen Shot 2014-08-31 at 12.01.39

Pahoehoe lava

These images were taken by scientists who were very close to the fissure location. They have now pulled back because of the bad weather.  Fire fountains go as high as 60 meters.

Screen Shot 2014-08-31 at 11.46.51 Screen Shot 2014-08-31 at 11.48.58

Bárðarbunga update August 31 09:36 UTC
- Weather conditions in the Holuhraun #eruption area make it difficult for everyone to monitor progress. Scientists have left the area.
- The fissure is about 1.5 km long, fire up to 60m in the air. Still no threat. Fly ban only up to 6000 feet.
- Domestic flights have been grounded due to weather conditions, not the eruption.

Bárðarbunga update August 31 08:44 UTC
NO science updates since yesterday
Scientists from IMO were installing additional sensors in the area near Holuhraun yesterday evening
Tremor is of course higher than before the eruption
The University of Iceland had analyzed the lava from the first eruption (same kind of lava now). Click here for details.
Scientists say “fissure longer than before.. picture below is from Benni” who was installing instrument

Screen Shot 2014-08-31 at 10.31.27

 

Bárðarbunga update August 31 08:03 UTC
If you cannot link to the Mila webcam, you are certainly not the only one. The network is once again saturated.
Part of the Icelandic air space is again forbidden to fly over. The ash emission from the fissure eruption is limited but nevertheless it could suddenly increase of course.

Screen Shot 2014-08-31 at 10.00.34

Bárðarbunga update August 31 06:27 UTC
This morning a new fissure eruption started in the same Holuhraun area as the first one. The webcam view is often obscured by the dand and dust in front of the fissure area. We expect the length of the fissure to be a little longer than the first one

Screen Shot 2014-08-31 at 08.23.32


OLDER ARCHIVED PARTS OF THIS REPORT :

2013 : July 8 – July 31
2013 : June 24 – July 7
2013 : June 8 – June 23
2013 : May 26 – June 7
2013 : June 8 – August 20
2013 : August 21 – October 27
2013 : October 28 – December 12
2013 : December 13 – January 30
2014 : February 1 – May 20
2014 : May 21 – August 20
2014 : August 21 – August 28 (Bardarbunga volcano Iceland)
2014 : August 29 – August 30 (Bardarbunga and Tavurvur)

Comments

  1. Gerhardt says:

    Hi Armand,
    do you really think that the output is about 1000m³/s? This would mean that the 1kmx3km-area is covered about 1.2 meters by Lava…
    Best regards from Bavaria
    Gerhardt

    • Gerhardt says:

      1.2 meters lava per hour of course!

    • Armand Vervaeck says:

      I had the same reflection than you but keep in mind that the eruption fissure is 1 km long. The data has been a couple of times repeated by to be trusted scientific sources, so i reckon its true. On the webcam it is hard to believe that fountains are up to 60 meter high, thats really high!

  2. Ilse says:

    It’s just dawning in Iceland and both Mila’s werbcams are showing beautiful shots of red hot lava flowing (or fountaining ?) from the fisure at Bardarbunga. Just thought I’d mention it for anyone who hasn’t looked lately……Enjoy:)

  3. Ilse says:

    Hi… just a question about Mila’s webcams. You are showing images of Bardarbunga that look like they are from Mila’s webcam. I cannot get their webcams to work for me. Been watching them a long time , never had trouble, and not that things are getting interesting ???? Anyway… just wondered if any one else is having a problem ? or is it just me?

    Thanks So Much for your great work at ER… you are the 1st place I check when I want to know what is going on in the world that is Important !

    • Lydia says:

      The Mila cams won’t work for me either, I had no problems with them until the 29th and now 30th of August, when I press play it comes up with a message saying, ‘cannot connect to server’. Really annoying as I want to watch these cams! :(

    • Armand Vervaeck says:

      Same problems everywhere. Reason : limited number of connections and limited time allowed online. Best you can do is Retrying at regular intervals. That works although it is frustrating

  4. Martin says:

    MILA now have two cams over Bardarbunga. But where exact are the cameras placed?
    http://www.livefromiceland.is/webcams/bardarbunga-2/

  5. Daniel says:

    Hi Armand!

    Other topic, same user, same fascination! :-)

    On the dust/steam.
    - doesn’t move that fast
    - rises high above its origin place
    - appears on two spots on the webcam

    Not sure, but a sandstorm/duststorm would look different to me.
    Things are beginning to become hot… ;)

    Grüße, Daniel

    • Armand Vervaeck says:

      Yep, have the same feeling about it + suddenly started + the weather type does not look to be very windy otherwise the dust would obscure the whole camera view. I expect the heli to have visited the area just before it happened. We have to wait a little longer

Speak Your Mind

*

Desktop Version